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Thread: Best way to fix a frown?

  1. #1
    Member moostashio's Avatar
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    Default Best way to fix a frown?

    This is a 9/16 blade from Westphal Cutlery, Solingen, and, as you can see, it's in a really bad mood. Suggestions? Breadknife time?
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    I used Nakayamas for my house mainaman's Avatar
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    Spine up from the stone 30-45* circles till the edge evens up, then normal honing to set the bevel.
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    Stefan

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    A lot of uneven hone wear on the spine, look carefully because maybe the blade is slightly curved. If it is curved give it a slight smiling profile, that will help honing.

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    moostashio (01-19-2014)

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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    So first of all that razor is like Dennis Rodman… It’s got ISSUES…

    But, if you want to fix it, breadknife on a diamond plate. The same amount of metal will have to be remove anyway you do it, so start with a straight edge and eliminate at least one issue, then hone at 45 degrees and tape to hone.

    Successful restoration begins at purchase, but you will learn a lot with problem razors
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    Senior Member blabbermouth 10Pups's Avatar
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    Don't forget to be telling it jokes the whole time. Hope you get it :<0)
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    Huh... Oh here pfries's Avatar
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    The lifted spine as mainaman said is a great suggestion,
    it is also one of the better techniques to have in your bag for chip repair and such.
    I have only bread knifed one blade in the traditional sense,
    at least for repair purposes, I do not consider a feather light drag on the corner of the stone bread knifing.
    Doing the lifted spine allows you to quickly remove metal from the edge and maintain a rough form of the bevel,
    when you go to reset the bevel you will have much less metal to remove and it goes exponentially quicker.
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    For fixing the edge I support Stefan's (mainaman) approach, but that looks to be only one part of your problem..

    It looks to me that when you take out the frown you will come in conflict with the heel/stabilizer, which will need to be ground down before you can hone it.
    Last edited by Zephyr; 01-19-2014 at 05:22 PM.
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    Senior Member UKRob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zephyr View Post
    For fixing the edge I support Stefan's (mainaman) approach, but that looks to be only one part of your problem..

    It looks to me that when you take out the frown you will come in conflict with the heel/stabilizer, which will need to be ground down before you can hone it.
    I thought exactly the same. It already looks as though a large part of the original width is gone and fixing the frown will make it even worse. Sometimes you just have to say it's more trouble than it's worth.

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    Member moostashio's Avatar
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    Thanks to all for the help. I didn't look at the frown in relation to the shoulder. That may be a deal-breaker. I have plenty of better old razors I could be working on, and the scales from this one could be used on a better blade.
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