View Poll Results: What have you found to be true

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  • Stainless Steel is more difficult

    10 38.46%
  • Carbon Steel is more difficult

    0 0%
  • Total myth I find no disernable difference

    16 61.54%
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Thread: Stainless Steel vs Carbon Steel

  1. #51
    I used Nakayamas for my house mainaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porl View Post
    Very interesting results on the poll so far. Nobody thinks carbon steel is more difficult, but twice as many people say that there is no difference to those that say stainless is more difficult.

    I wonder could the honing medium play a part in the results here? In other words are some stones better for stainless than others?

    Perhaps that is a different topic, if so I am sorry and please feel free to ignore this question.
    Stainless is more abrasion resistant than carbon, unless you are dealing with some mosntrously hard carbon.
    For Stainless I know not bother with naturals at all, straight to the synthetics. I admit that I am stubborn and still trying on Jnats from time to time. Very few times have I had success.
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    Stefan

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  3. #52
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainaman View Post
    I deal with lots of Friodurs and can count the number of spot rusted ones on the fingers of my one hand. They can be magnetized but they do not rust easy at all.
    I think we are talking two different things. When I said "non magnetic" I meant not attracted to a magnet. I just checked these stainless steel razors, Schulze, Herder, George Ibberson, Hess 44 and a Friodur to see if they were attracted to my magnetic kitchen knife bar. They all were attracted to it.

    I am sure they can be magnetized but that is a different thing. Yes, they are extremely hard to rust but it can be done.

    Bob
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    After listening to someone talk ever wonder who ties their shoe laces?

  4. #53
    Senior Member kelbro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyHAD View Post
    Speaking of magnetic stainless, just ran into this All-Clad cookware advert, note the 'magnetic stainless' on the exterior for the newer induction cooktops :

    Attachment 248836

    (The illustration displays a cross section of one All-Clad Copper Core pan)

    Very difficult to hone though ......... impossible to set a bevel ..........
    Once you go All-Clad, you can never go back...

    Expensive but excellent performance.
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  5. #54
    I used Nakayamas for my house mainaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    I think we are talking two different things. When I said "non magnetic" I meant not attracted to a magnet. I just checked these stainless steel razors, Schulze, Herder, George Ibberson, Hess 44 and a Friodur to see if they were attracted to my magnetic kitchen knife bar. They all were attracted to it.

    I am sure they can be magnetized but that is a different thing. Yes, they are extremely hard to rust but it can be done.

    Bob
    I made my comment in regards to non-magnetic steel = more stainless. Stainless steel razors are pretty magnetic, so not that stainless by that feature, and yet do not rust easy at all. So, as you said, there is no need of extreme stain resistance for straight razor stainless steel.
    Stefan

  6. #55
    Not with my razor 🚫 SirStropalot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brontosaurus View Post
    Please elaborate upon the difference between carbon steel and stainless steel as termed here.
    Quote Originally Posted by prodigy View Post
    Stainless steel contains chromium.
    Quote Originally Posted by gssixgun View Post
    Honestly it is rather hard to elaborate on
    I agree "it is rather hard to elaborate on". Chromium is/can be an element in stainless, but nickel and other elements play a large part in the desired properties of stainless. Some are more corrosion, abrasion, or impact resistant, or may or may not have magnetic properties, etc.. This leads back, I think, to the experience of the honer. If it's a harder metal like stainless in its various forms, or even a very hard "chippy" carbon, or an older Sheffield steel that may not be able to handle the edges produced by a Shapton Glass stone, the honer has to recognize and adapt to the steel.

    Difficult?? Yes and No!!!

    Experience drives the bus of difficulty...usually! But I think some blades test even the metal of our elite "Honemeisters"!!

    Best Regards,

    Howard

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  8. #56
    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    The magnetic properties of stainless depends on the micro structure. Austenetic stainless is non-magnetic, stainless that can maintain an edge is martensetic and is attracted to a magnet. It is due to the lattice structure. Most Austenetic stainless is still ~82% iron and yet is not attracted to a magnet at all.

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  10. #57
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    Vic, Hi again buddy! Good to see you also. Good info there - additionally some of the austenitic stainless steels are commonly known as "3 series" i.e. 304ss etc. Some martensitic are commonly known as "4 series" stainless steels such as 440ss etc. as well as others such as 154cm etc. - if it's being used as a blade steel is almost always a martensitic.

    There are also ferritic and duplex families of stainless steels.

    Austenitic stainless steel is always either barely or not at all attracted to a magnet and not hardenable except by cold working (i.e. work hardening by rolling, rubbing, cold forging).

    Martensitic stainless is hardenable by common heat treatment and is almost always attracted to a magnet. Ferritic stainless steels are attracted to a magnet but can't be heat treated.

    Duplex stainless is basically a balance between the alloying ingredients that would normally make the steel austenitic or ferritic. Duplex stainless is the highest in pitting/corrosion resistance.

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