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Thread: Interesting Blog about Edge Development.

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    Jack of all, master of none KenWeir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    One thing for certain is that those photos contain a lot of info if they can be interpreted properly. Like anything it can be interpreted many different ways.

    You really have to stop and ask yourself if all this info is necessary to achieve shave ready edge? Do you really need more info than a good 10X-20X loupe will give you to that end?

    Bob
    Not at all, but it's interesting
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    Senior Member ScoutHikerDad's Avatar
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    Interesting pics and blog-Those pics look like a jagged mountain range or something. I don't know how much it helps the average guy honing at his kitchen table, but it's interesting to see that extreme magnification of a developing edge. Thanks for sharing the link!
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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    One thing for certain is that those photos contain a lot of info if they can be interpreted properly. Like anything it can be interpreted many different ways.

    You really have to stop and ask yourself if all this info is necessary to achieve shave ready edge? Do you really need more info than a good 10X-20X loupe will give you to that end?
    Bob
    Sometimes. I actually just went through a bit of an issue the other day. Touched up a Germania Cutlery Works that was shaving A-OK when I set it aside a few months back. Well, it didn't look bad under a 30x loupe, so I touched it up on a Translucent Arkie. Shave improved, but still not really good. Inspection under a 60x magnifier really didn't reveal anything new either. Edges were meeting. No pits/chips/foiled edges. I did another touch up, and never did figure out just what was going on with that thing...but it shaves OK now so, I'll take it I guess?
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    Senior Member UKRob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshal View Post
    Sometimes. I actually just went through a bit of an issue the other day. Touched up a Germania Cutlery Works that was shaving A-OK when I set it aside a few months back. Well, it didn't look bad under a 30x loupe, so I touched it up on a Translucent Arkie. Shave improved, but still not really good. Inspection under a 60x magnifier really didn't reveal anything new either. Edges were meeting. No pits/chips/foiled edges. I did another touch up, and never did figure out just what was going on with that thing...but it shaves OK now so, I'll take it I guess?
    You seem to be saying that the increased magnification did nothing to help you assess the problem - and that seems to be the point that others are making - if a problem is not obvious at, say, 20 times magnification, then what is 500 magnification going to add?
    N
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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    I could be wrong, but I would imagine there would have to be some sort of visually identifiable flaw that kept that razor from shaving 'right.' The fact that I couldn't identify it at 30x, and again at 60x doesn't mean higher magnification than I have on hand wouldn't more readily reveal what was wrong with the edge.

    I guess you could say that, because I got the razor to shave properly without it, no - higher magnification isn't needed.

    But I would really like to know what it was I was missing. If I knew that, it could be avoided in the future. Since I don't really have a clue, I learned nothing from the experience outside of 'Doesn't shave, back to hones.' So there's a significant chance I'll see a similar problem in the future.
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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshal View Post
    I could be wrong, but I would imagine there would have to be some sort of visually identifiable flaw that kept that razor from shaving 'right.' The fact that I couldn't identify it at 30x, and again at 60x doesn't mean higher magnification than I have on hand wouldn't more readily reveal what was wrong with the edge.

    I guess you could say that, because I got the razor to shave properly without it, no - higher magnification isn't needed.

    But I would really like to know what it was I was missing. If I knew that, it could be avoided in the future. Since I don't really have a clue, I learned nothing from the experience outside of 'Doesn't shave, back to hones.' So there's a significant chance I'll see a similar problem in the future.
    I would look at it this way. If I can see a problem with a 10x-20x loupe then there is a problem. If I see a problem at 500x then it is not really a problem in any practical sense. Tied to that is that I must be able to interpret what I see at 10x-20x mag correctly in order to see a problem. There in lies the rub, thank you Will Shakespeare.

    Bob
    After listening to someone talk ever wonder who ties their shoe laces?

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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    I would look at it this way. If I can see a problem with a 10x-20x loupe then there is a problem. If I see a problem at 500x then it is not really a problem in any practical sense. Tied to that is that I must be able to interpret what I see at 10x-20x mag correctly in order to see a problem. There in lies the rub, thank you Will Shakespeare.

    Bob
    This is true. But the foil to that is, if I see something that catches my eye at high magnification, then I drop back down and look at the same spot under 20x. Now I see something amiss that didn't catch my eye the first once over at 20x. I've identified that there IS a problem because it can be seen at low magnification. I know where it is. And I know what to look for in the future under both levels of magnification.

    I view it as another learning tool. Viewing various issues at varying magnifications will train your eye to spot the problem just like feeling an edge that won't shave and comparing it to one that will can calibrate your thumb and train it to feel a problem area without a lick of magnification. It helps to see that problem area under magnification before you put your thumb pad against the edge, as well as having a good edge to compare it to. Just like it helps to see an edge at high magnification, then step back down to see if you can spot the reason it won't shave at low magnification. Maybe in a few months you don't need/want high magnification often, in a couple of years you don't need/want any for most blades. No shame in having a set of training wheels to fall back on until you've learned to ride comfortably without 'em.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshal View Post
    This is true. But the foil to that is, if I see something that catches my eye at high magnification, then I drop back down and look at the same spot under 20x. Now I see something amiss that didn't catch my eye the first once over at 20x. I've identified that there IS a problem because it can be seen at low magnification. I know where it is. And I know what to look for in the future under both levels of magnification.

    I view it as another learning tool. Viewing various issues at varying magnifications will train your eye to spot the problem just like feeling an edge that won't shave and comparing it to one that will can calibrate your thumb and train it to feel a problem area without a lick of magnification. It helps to see that problem area under magnification before you put your thumb pad against the edge, as well as having a good edge to compare it to. Just like it helps to see an edge at high magnification, then step back down to see if you can spot the reason it won't shave at low magnification. Maybe in a few months you don't need/want high magnification often, in a couple of years you don't need/want any for most blades. No shame in having a set of training wheels to fall back on until you've learned to ride comfortably without 'em.
    Yup, those are good points. I have seen beginners jump on the high magnification bandwagon from the get go and drive themselves crazy trying for the perfect edge under high magnification. In some cases when you see something under high magnification that you believe looks like a problem may not, in reality, be a problem. I have gotten smooth comfortable shaves from blades that when looked at under 10x-20x mag reveal some very slight imperfections in the edge. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

    Bob
    After listening to someone talk ever wonder who ties their shoe laces?

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    Historically Inquisitive Martin103's Avatar
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    Just take your best shaving razor and look at it under high magnification, more then likely you will be very surprised at what you see.

  10. #20
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    Yup, those are good points. I have seen beginners jump on the high magnification bandwagon from the get go and drive themselves crazy trying for the perfect edge under high magnification. In some cases when you see something under high magnification that you believe looks like a problem may not, in reality, be a problem. I have gotten smooth comfortable shaves from blades that when looked at under 10x-20x mag reveal some very slight imperfections in the edge. Sometimes good enough is good enough.

    Bob
    Agreed, and that is why the shave test should always be the guide and definitive factor. If it shaves, let well enough alone.
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