View Poll Results: Fins: Fact or Fiction? (public results poll)

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  • Fins are real and serve a purpose

    11 25.58%
  • Fins are BS

    32 74.42%
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  1. #1
    yeehaw. Ben325e's Avatar
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    Default Fin: fact or fiction?

    So I keep reading about a "fin" at the edge of a straight razor. I kinda think it's BS. If there was a fin at the edge of the straight razor, then it would be so thin that it would fold over super easy as soon as it came into contact with anything harder than wet toilet paper (which we all know, is actually the absolute worst thing in the world when you get surprised by accidentally wet toilet paper...)

    In all of the micrographs that I've seen, there has been no sign if a fin. I tend to feel that a proper straight razor edge is the perfect meeting of two planes with an angle of 15 to 17 degrees between the two.

    More like a " V " than a " Y "

    The fin seems to be a product of overhoning more than anything.


    I'm in the "Fins are BS" camp. Where do you stand?

  2. #2
    Senior Member kevint's Avatar
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    I've wondered if stropping could possibly remove it. Verhoevan did not do near as much stropping as we do.

    Problem with the micrographs none have the resolution/ magnification to show it.

  3. #3
    what Dad calls me nun2sharp's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kevint View Post

    Problem with the micrographs none have the resolution/ magnification to show it.

    So, theyre like leprachauns, you know they are there but.....you just cant see them! I dont believe it!
    Fins do not exist!
    It is easier to fool people than to convince them they have been fooled. Twain

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  5. #4
    Senior Member Lt.Arclight's Avatar
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    Default

    OK, you can also put me into the "Fins are BS" camp too.In fact, I think "overhoning" is overstated.Yes, you can develop a "burr"-but IMO, that is a result of poor honing technique. Especially at the lower grits if too much pressure is being used.

    Kevint, also raises a very valid point.The study performed by Verhovan invovled stropping- but I know most of us spend alot of time putting steel on linen/cotton and leather. I doubt he stropped as much.

    Interesting question...

  6. #5
    Never a dull moment hoglahoo's Avatar
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    Default

    this thread needs a poll attached

    By the way, for those who have not read it (or anyone) can find the study here File:Help Files Knifessharpeningexperiment.pdf - Straight Razor Place Wiki

    Last edited by gugi; 12-29-2009 at 08:59 PM. Reason: update link
    Find me on SRP's official chat in ##srp on Freenode. Link is at top of SRP's homepage

  7. #6
    Senior Member kevint's Avatar
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    Indeed fellows, but if you look at JV's photos you will see it.

  8. #7
    yeehaw. Ben325e's Avatar
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    Verhoeven wasn't studying razors, was he? In the world of knife sharpening, a burr is a beautiful thing sometimes. It is one of the stepping stones on the way to sharpness, whereas in straights forming a burr is left to... well... people other than me.

    The stropping involed in Verhoevens study was on a Tormek grinder with a leather wheel. He found that stropping produced the best edge, right (it's been over a year since I looked at his stuff... tell me if I'm wrong on any of this...), well we know that stropping gets the best edge. Otherwise Tony Miller wouldn't have sold out before christmas.

  9. #8
    Senior Member kevint's Avatar
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    Sharpening is sharpening Ben. There is a difference between the macro bur and the micro burr that has been called the fin.

    If you are setting a bevel you are creating a burr or the bevel is not set. I tried to describe my thoughts on why the razor is not as apparent as when a tactile obvious burr is the goal in my thread on overhoning.

  10. #9
    Senior Moderator JimmyHAD's Avatar
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    I don't know about fins or no fins. If the razor is sharp I shave and if isn't I hone it until it is.
    Be careful how you treat people on your way up, you may meet them again on your way back down.

  11. #10
    Oh Yes! poona's Avatar
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    Well if you have included my quote of 'fin' within a few of my late posts, I was simply referring to the fin as the bevel.

    Apologies if this is not the current buzzword to use as I haven't been on here as much lately and therefore am not up to date with current analogies.

    I believe a razor has just a body and bevel which tapers into a very sharp edge. And this is backed up by use of a microscope for checking bevels during hone jobs.

    When you analyze it, surely it would be impossible for an edge to achieve the Y shape due to the spine not allowing a perfect parallel plane. It is always going to be V shaped no matter what you do with the hone.

    When I look at the fin of a shark, it tapers to a thin edge from the body. I used this analogy to refer to a razor. I think the use of buzzwords shouldnt be taken too seriously.
    Last edited by poona; 12-29-2008 at 05:28 PM.

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