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Thread: More on high passes - with pics

  1. #21
    This is not my actual head. HNSB's Avatar
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    I went from the 12k to CrOx to stropping.

    Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government.

  2. #22
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    Wow, that was quick reply.

    So what I've read here kind of gives me the message:
    forget the big repetition counts you've read about in JaNorton, instead use necessary (many) strokes to set the bevel with low grit (1K) stone, then move up the ladder with no more than ~20 strokes at each step, and no pressure.
    ?
    At least in theory...

    I'll have to try that one next. Perhaps that's good option for newbie: less chances to make mistakes which kill the edge.

  3. #23
    This is not my actual head. HNSB's Avatar
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    I'd say do 20 strokes, test for improvement, do 20 more strokes, test, etc...
    Continue that at each grit until you don't have any more improvement.

    Remember that every razor is different. Stroke counts can cause problems because the number of strokes that work for one razor may not work for another.
    This particular razor seemed to do well at 20 strokes. The next one might take 10 or might take 40.

    The biggest thing I got out of this razor and series of pictures is that pressure causes harm almost immediately.

    Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Kingfish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HNSB View Post
    The biggest thing I got out of this razor and series of pictures is that pressure causes harm almost immediately.
    For sure, you just said a mouthfull. The lighter the pressure the higher the effective grit range? Maybe that idea is flawed, but it works for me and if it has been said before, I am with you.

    On the other hand if you use pressure, you force the edge to conform the the microundulations of the stone, stone wins and edge degrades. Probably a little of both, but anyone who has advanced to high end finishing in this sport and feels himself accomplished has a good set of hands and is just kissing that stone to squeeze that last little bit of smoooothness.

    Also, I really think that good micro pics have a big part of the future of the advancement of the "science" behind what we do. For example, what do smooth egdes look like, are there common features? I only have a light microscope that is quite usefull to about 100x but has at least taught me some things I don't like in an edge.
    Well done.

  5. #25
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingfish View Post
    Also, I really think that good micro pics have a big part of the future of the advancement of the "science" behind what we do. For example, what do smooth egdes look like, are there common features? I only have a light microscope that is quite usefull to about 100x but has at least taught me some things I don't like in an edge.
    I agree microscopes are a valuable tool. Use a cheap one a fair bit. I also agree that I can see things that are obviously not conducive to a nice shave but I'm puzzled that a smooth shaving edge doesn't always look like what I expect it to. I like to see a super smooth straight-ish line in an edge yet some razors that appear slightly toothy can shave just as nicely. Good topic for another thread maybe.
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Kingfish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onimaru55 View Post
    I agree microscopes are a valuable tool. Use a cheap one a fair bit. I also agree that I can see things that are obviously not conducive to a nice shave but I'm puzzled that a smooth shaving edge doesn't always look like what I expect it to. I like to see a super smooth straight-ish line in an edge yet some razors that appear slightly toothy can shave just as nicely. Good topic for another thread maybe.
    Fore sure! To add to the mix is shaving style and how different edges act. When I first started straight shaving, my shaving strokes were straight on with no scything or point leading as taught in barber schools. At that time I would not have appreciated nearly as much as I do now the edges I get from natural stones which under magnification leave more visible tooth than a shapton 30k.

    In the end I am not confident that all of our science could make a better straight shave but it does make us better understand what we are doing from hone to shave. Maybe it is like the perfection of a violin that occured centries ago from an accumilation experiments and improvements that lead to it's current state but have not really improved in any major way for more than two centries. A violin is made of around 70 parts all working together as a whole, any variation in material or form is mostly considered bad for the sound.
    onimaru55 likes this.

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