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Thread: Fosters Old English razor

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    Senior Member 1971Wedge's Avatar
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    Default Fosters Old English razor

    I just got this today, having won it on ebay, and it came fast as it is was a local auction. I love it, and I wanna shave with it at some point. I really dig the horn scales on it, are they horn or tortoise? What's the history on this razor?

    Here's a picture from the ebay sale, I'll post some later with the scales under light. Should I just restore this in one piece, clean the scales and do the neatfoot oil thing, or should it come apart? I've done and had this done by other's for me on other razors, but this one seems more vintage.

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    Senior Moderator JimmyHAD's Avatar
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    Cool razor. I'm thinking 1820 or so. If it was mine I might do neatsfoot on the scales, maybe metal polish on a paper towel on the blade but I wouldn't go beyond that. Took a long time to get that patina and it is not unattractive to my eye. I certainly wouldn't unpin it unless it was absolutely necessary.

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    Senior Member 1971Wedge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyHAD View Post
    Cool razor. I'm thinking 1820 or so. If it was mine I might do neatsfoot on the scales, maybe metal polish on a paper towel on the blade but I wouldn't go beyond that. Took a long time to get that patina and it is not unattractive to my eye. I certainly wouldn't unpin it unless it was absolutely necessary.

    JimmyHad, that's kinda how I'm feeling on this one. There is one spot of delamination on the scale, which makes me think tortoise?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1971Wedge View Post
    JimmyHad, that's kinda how I'm feeling on this one. There is one spot of delamination on the scale, which makes me think tortoise?
    Couldn't tell you on the scales. The tortoise was laminated though to it may be.

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    I was bidding on that one too!! What a great piece of history. I'm glad it went to someone here. I would second the info here already. A little polish and some neatfoot oil and you are done. That was my plan anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1971Wedge View Post
    JimmyHad, that's kinda how I'm feeling on this one. There is one spot of delamination on the scale, which makes me think tortoise?
    I would say 99% horn. Old horn I've worked with delaminates like that. I would just neatsfoot the scales and hone it up. Looks great, you outbid me as well on that one

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    Senior Member 1971Wedge's Avatar
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    Here are the scales under light, they are soaking in neatfoot oil for the moment, maas's polish did a quick clean up on the blade, but debating on sanding or not. Again...given the age, might be best to leave the blemishes to remind me of age.
    After I cleaned the scales, I did a light neatfoot rub, I found there is a slight crack at the pivot on one side, but nothing bad for the moment.

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    A guy that used to live local and do a lot of restoring told me that hand sanding averaged 10 hours on a blade. Before he went to the buffers. He used to watch TV and sand. I began one once and after an hour or so I called it good. Not my cup of tea. I came to appreciate the patina of blades that are 100+ years old.

    Not if they're rust buckets but there is a difference. I don't particularly care for a 150 year old Sheffield that shines like a new dime in a goat's ass. I know that turns some guys on and that is fine. Different strokes.
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    Senior Member 1971Wedge's Avatar
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    JimmyHad, after having a carpal and ulna nerve release on my dominate (right) wrist, and tennis elbow, I'm kinda limited for hand sanding at this time, but can still do that. I used to hand sand on cars....gotta be careful with your body.


    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyHAD View Post
    A guy that used to live local and do a lot of restoring told me that hand sanding averaged 10 hours on a blade. Before he went to the buffers. He used to watch TV and sand. I began one once and after an hour or so I called it good. Not my cup of tea. I came to appreciate the patina of blades that are 100+ years old.

    Not if they're rust buckets but there is a difference. I don't particularly care for a 150 year old Sheffield that shines like a new dime in a goat's ass. I know that turns some guys on and that is fine. Different strokes.
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    Wow, that is a nice one. I'm a little jealous. The thing about not un-pinning it is, you can't adequately sand and polish the inside of the scales, or fix the crack properly. Also, working on the blade while within the scales gives the scales more opportunity to crack.

    I'd talk to Glenn, he does more restores using original equipment than most. Me, I'd make that sucker look like a new dime in a goats ass lol
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