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Thread: Dent on edge of razor

  1. #51
    Senior Member blabbermouth eddy79's Avatar
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    You understood correctly first. Strop on the hone to straighten it out before trying to remove all the metal required to hone the dent out. This way you remove less of the edge and is less work
    400E likes this.
    My wife calls me......... Can you just use Ed

  2. #52
    Senior Member blabbermouth niftyshaving's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarekrashid View Post
    I could not understand the TNT. I read an article somewhere, but could not understand how the razor should "feel" like
    It turns out that the thumb nail is a lot like heavy whisker and will "catch" on a sharp
    edge. Most beginners catch on a thumbnail with too much pressure and that is not good for a fine edge.
    Some old timers have a very light touch and like it as a test. The thumb pad also catches and if you use more than a
    light touch will cut yourself. Thus a thumb pad test is is a good test for the razor, good for your thumb... well depends
    on how light a touch.

    I like what I call a wild hair test.
    You can use a shed bristle from an old boar brush or raid the hairbrush of a dark hair
    friend.

    A hair or bristle will catch on a well set bevil it will skate and slide on dull.
    After a good finish hone the same hair will just fall off the edge...
    I can test the entire length of a blade by touching the last 1 mm or 1/8 inch
    of the hair to the edge. A two inch hair lets me touch and test a dozen + spots
    from toe to heel on a razor.
    If you have gray hair like me use a dark background so you can see the grey hair (or blond).

    Butchers will sometimes touch their edge to a chopstick or a hard plastic rod or cutting board edge to see if it catches.
    A sharp kitchen knife will catch on a common wood chopstick.
    For kitchen knives... a tomato, with the peel attached, or a green apple is a good gauge.
    You should be able to easily cut into the surface by directing the knife with very little pressure and slight slicing motion.
    Same for green pepper, skin side up should slice as easy as skin side down. A dull knife slides and skates
    on green pepper or tomato skin.
    tarekrashid likes this.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to niftyshaving For This Useful Post:

    tarekrashid (10-01-2017)

  4. #53
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    Thanks for bringing knives into the picture...

    I was actually wondering whether I could use 4k/8k to sharpen knives.


    Quote Originally Posted by niftyshaving View Post
    It turns out that the thumb nail is a lot like heavy whisker and will "catch" on a sharp
    edge. Most beginners catch on a thumbnail with too much pressure and that is not good for a fine edge.
    Some old timers have a very light touch and like it as a test. The thumb pad also catches and if you use more than a
    light touch will cut yourself. Thus a thumb pad test is is a good test for the razor, good for your thumb... well depends
    on how light a touch.

    I like what I call a wild hair test.
    You can use a shed bristle from an old boar brush or raid the hairbrush of a dark hair
    friend.

    A hair or bristle will catch on a well set bevil it will skate and slide on dull.
    After a good finish hone the same hair will just fall off the edge...
    I can test the entire length of a blade by touching the last 1 mm or 1/8 inch
    of the hair to the edge. A two inch hair lets me touch and test a dozen + spots
    from toe to heel on a razor.
    If you have gray hair like me use a dark background so you can see the grey hair (or blond).

    Butchers will sometimes touch their edge to a chopstick or a hard plastic rod or cutting board edge to see if it catches.
    A sharp kitchen knife will catch on a common wood chopstick.
    For kitchen knives... a tomato, with the peel attached, or a green apple is a good gauge.
    You should be able to easily cut into the surface by directing the knife with very little pressure and slight slicing motion.
    Same for green pepper, skin side up should slice as easy as skin side down. A dull knife slides and skates
    on green pepper or tomato skin.

  5. #54
    Member
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    Yes I actually ruined the edge by doing the TNT with pressure.

    Quote Originally Posted by niftyshaving View Post
    It turns out that the thumb nail is a lot like heavy whisker and will "catch" on a sharp
    edge. Most beginners catch on a thumbnail with too much pressure and that is not good for a fine edge.
    Some old timers have a very light touch and like it as a test. The thumb pad also catches and if you use more than a
    light touch will cut yourself. Thus a thumb pad test is is a good test for the razor, good for your thumb... well depends
    on how light a touch.

    I like what I call a wild hair test.
    You can use a shed bristle from an old boar brush or raid the hairbrush of a dark hair
    friend.

    A hair or bristle will catch on a well set bevil it will skate and slide on dull.
    After a good finish hone the same hair will just fall off the edge...
    I can test the entire length of a blade by touching the last 1 mm or 1/8 inch
    of the hair to the edge. A two inch hair lets me touch and test a dozen + spots
    from toe to heel on a razor.
    If you have gray hair like me use a dark background so you can see the grey hair (or blond).

    Butchers will sometimes touch their edge to a chopstick or a hard plastic rod or cutting board edge to see if it catches.
    A sharp kitchen knife will catch on a common wood chopstick.
    For kitchen knives... a tomato, with the peel attached, or a green apple is a good gauge.
    You should be able to easily cut into the surface by directing the knife with very little pressure and slight slicing motion.
    Same for green pepper, skin side up should slice as easy as skin side down. A dull knife slides and skates
    on green pepper or tomato skin.

  6. #55
    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarekrashid View Post
    Yes I actually ruined the edge by doing the TNT with pressure.
    I only use the TNT at bevel set and even then it is with very light pressure.
    niftyshaving likes this.
    See my razors at bluesmanblades.com

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