Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Junior Member Chemist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Canton, MI
    Posts
    13
    Thanked: 0

    Default Looking for the first one...

    So I've been thinking about getting a straight razor for some time now and have finally decided to go ahead with it. I've been looking around and like what I see with Dovo and their Renaissance and Bismarck blades. Both of which are a bit on the pricey side (for a college student graduating in a few days), and since it would be my first razor I'm wondering if it might be a better decision to buy something cheaper that is still of good quality. Any suggestions? I've looked through the classifieds but am not well versed enough to make the decision on my own.

    Words of wisdom? Ideas?

  2. #2
    ace
    ace is offline
    Senior Member blabbermouth ace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,353
    Thanked: 578

    Default

    This is available in the classifieds for $50, and the one below it for $60, shave ready.

    5/8 Square Point Otto Birkhofer, Gemany - Straight Razor Place Classifieds

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to ace For This Useful Post:

    Chemist (04-25-2011)

  4. #3
    Customized Birnando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    5,052
    Thanked: 1657

    Default

    Hi. Welcome to SRP.
    You've found the right place for this new interest of yours

    The 2 razors you are mentioning are both great shavers, and they would serve you well for decades to come.
    If they are a bit on the price side, then I recommend, as you have already done, looking at the classifieds right here on SRP.


    The standard recommendation we usually give is to find a razor in the middle of the spectrum, meaning both size and grind.
    However, any properly sharpened razor will work.
    My personal recommendation for you would be a 5/8" or 6/8" sized razor. Half hollow or something like that will work fine.

    If you feel at all troubled by buying products from strangers on the internet, let me just tell you that I've seen so many razors sold from the classifieds, and so many happy shavers as a result
    I myself have bought a bunch from there, and I am nothing but super happy about every single transaction.

    Another tip is to use some time reading in our WIKI.
    It is a great resource for a lot of the questions you have, and will have, as soon as you start shaving!
    Feel free to ask if there is anything on your mind, there are a lot of really great and knowledgable guys in here. And they are more than willing to help out
    Bjoernar
    Um, all of them, any of them that have been in front of me over all these years....


  5. #4
    Junior Member Chemist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Canton, MI
    Posts
    13
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Thanks a lot! I guess the follow question would be, if I pick up a professionally sharpened blade, how soon after will I likely need to buy the rest of the equipment (strop, hone, etc.) to maintain the blade? If I should really have all of those from the get go I may end up looking into some of the wet shaving sets offered on straight razor designs.

  6. #5
    Forum mogwai thebigspendur's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    27,640
    Thanked: 4395
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    You should have a strop to go along with the razor. You'll probably want a brush also to make lather with which of course means buying some soap.
    Every day without fail one should consider himself as dead-Tsunetomo

  7. #6
    Customized Birnando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    5,052
    Thanked: 1657

    Default

    You should get a strop, a brush, and a quality soap right away.
    A razor will need to be stropped before, and preferably after, every shave. The edge will deteriorate rather quickly without that.
    Hones, you should wait a bit with that. learn to shave first, then start focusing on honing.
    A barber hone or separate strop with paste for touch would be good.
    That should keep you going for quite a while
    Bjoernar
    Um, all of them, any of them that have been in front of me over all these years....


  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    280
    Thanked: 39

    Default

    Besides the strop, make sure you get a quality soap, as mentioned above. Look at the recommended brands in the reviews here. Even though some of them are pricey, they do last a long time.
    I don't know where you are, but in central texas lots of stores carry a brand Herban Cowboy (also sold under the name Natural Grooming or something like that). Don't buy their shaving soap! It dries out on your face right away and also makes your face dry, leading to LOTS of abrasions. I've tried both of their soaps, and they're horrible. Their boar's hair brush is pretty lame, but for $7 I guess it gets the job done. Anyway, buy a quality soap (or cream), it will make learning to use a straight a lot easier.

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,372
    Thanked: 268

    Default

    The least-costly option for razor and strop (you need both) is probably

    Whipped Dog Straight Razor Sales

    For a "budget razor" that shaves well, Larry's prices are hard to beat. His "Poor Man's Strop Kit" includes both a leather strop, and pasted strops. Should keep you going for months.

    A brush and shaving soap (or shaving cream), you can find in most drugstores.

    Charles

  10. #9
    Senior Member dirtychrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    652
    Thanked: 408

    Default

    So many great choices to choose from. Both your Dovo choices are fine razors, but due to thumb notch on the Bismarck, I would not make that your first.

    The notch makes it a very pleasant holding position while shaving, but learning to strop with a notch I don't think is the best route.

    IMO A traditional flat shank will work better to learn stropping technique and smoothly flip the razor as you change your stroke on the leather
    Last edited by dirtychrome; 04-26-2011 at 11:16 PM. Reason: Oppps called the shank the tang

  11. #10
    The Electrochemist PhatMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Hastings, UK
    Posts
    1,714
    Thanked: 526

    Default

    Chemist,

    If you want new build, I would suggest the Dovo Best. This is available in 5/8 & 6/8, half or full hollow.

    An extremely competent workhorse of a razor

    Straightrazordesigns have them for ca 69 USD.

    Have fun !

    Bets regards

    Russ

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •