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Thread: What is a good starter razor?

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    Default What is a good starter razor?

    Hello, I am 16 years old and i am looking to take up shaving with a straight razor. I like the idea of the nostalgia that comes with shaving with a straight razor, and I would like to be a part of it. I was given a brush and cup by my grandparents that was reportedly their grandparents, so i think it would be a good time to get into it. What are some razors that are good for beginners, I am looking for a vintage razor(preferably not new) and have a budget of around $200 but could budge if I really like it.

    Vintage Dubl Duck Wonderedge Pearl Duck Solingen Germany Straight Razor Nice | eBay this is what i am currently looking at, is it a good razor? or starter? please point me in the right direction or recommend any other types that are good for beginners.
    thanks

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    Well Shaved Gentleman... jhenry's Avatar
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    collan,

    That is an excellent brand of razor. However, I don't know if that is the best investment for you. You want an entry level razor; something that you can use, abuse, even break while learning to shave with a straight razor without shedding too many tears.

    To my mind the best type of straight razor for you to give serious consideration to would be a Dovo "Best Quality." Its relatively inexpensive, very good quality and will cost less that 100 bucks. If you purchase it from one of the vendors who advertise here, such as Straight Razor Designs or Vintage Blades it will also be professionally honed and shave ready when you get it.

    BTW...You will also need a good quality strop. Both of the vendors I just mentioned offer those for sale too.

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    Living and Dying in Time JBHoren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by collan1219 View Post
    Hello, I am 16 years old and i am looking to take up shaving with a straight razor. I like the idea of the nostalgia that comes with shaving with a straight razor, and I would like to be a part of it. I was given a brush and cup by my grandparents that was reportedly their grandparents, so i think it would be a good time to get into it. What are some razors that are good for beginners, I am looking for a vintage razor(preferably not new) and have a budget of around $200 but could budge if I really like it.

    Vintage Dubl Duck Wonderedge Pearl Duck Solingen Germany Straight Razor Nice | eBay this is what i am currently looking at, is it a good razor? or starter? please point me in the right direction or recommend any other types that are good for beginners.
    thanks
    I'm more inclined to advise you to purchase a used straight razor from the SRP Classified listings. Here's one: Le Grelot Merle Blanc - Straight Razor Place Classifieds which I recommend, for $60, and the seller mentions that it's "shave-ready" (important!). PS: This razor is a fine, old-name brand, one you can use daily and keep for-ever. Ask grandpa -- he probably only had one... all he needed.

    There are plenty of under-$100 strops (new!), which would allow you to "park" the remainder of your $200 budget, or buy yourself some good shaving soap and/or shaving cream.

    The world is your oyster!

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    Sharp as a spoon. ReardenSteel's Avatar
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    Welcome SRP. Sound advice given so far so I'll just add be sure to sign up for the "Monthly Give-away" in the Beginners' Section if you have not done so already!
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    Senior Member blabbermouth RezDog's Avatar
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    My two cents is that you should buy something for less as well. My logic is that you may not be in love with your first razor. There is a bit different experience with the different grinds. Most I am guessing like the full hollows, in my mind that explains why there are so many more of them. Some re into wedges and others fall somewhere in between. If you start with something inexpensive and later wish to try a different grind you will have a little budget for that. Also you should be able to get near what you pay for your inexpensive razor bak later should you decide to part with it.
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    I'd recommend the Feather available in the Classifieds. It's 85 bucks, requires nothing in terms of a strop or stropping expertise and will provide you an easy and foolproof introduction to straight shaving. You can avoid all the Newbie issues of sharpness, maintenance and all the doubts that come with starting this hobby. I started with a Shavette, a less expensive and less effective variant of the Feather. I now have a Feather among all my other straights and love using it for a really close shave. A great razor and a great learning tool.
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    MJC
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    In addition to Ace's recommendation on the SS (a perfect edge is only minutes and less than $1 away) when you do try regular Straights I'd recommend either the Dove BQ from SRD as jhenry noted and/or something from the great Classifieds here at SRP.

    For strops I'm a huge fan of the SRD Modular - when you mess up (and you will) you can replace the damaged surface for a fraction of the cost.
    And I use the system with felt pads and diamond spray to maintain the edge.

    Lots to learn, worth the effort, many of us wish we had started years (decades) ago...

    All the best and great shaving!
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    Senior Member kwlfca's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBHoren View Post
    I'm more inclined to advise you to purchase a used straight razor from the SRP Classified listings. Here's one: Le Grelot Merle Blanc - Straight Razor Place Classifieds which I recommend, for $60, and the seller mentions that it's "shave-ready" (important!). PS: This razor is a fine, old-name brand, one you can use daily and keep for-ever. Ask grandpa -- he probably only had one... all he needed.

    There are plenty of under-$100 strops (new!), which would allow you to "park" the remainder of your $200 budget, or buy yourself some good shaving soap and/or shaving cream.

    The world is your oyster!
    +1 to this advice. The razor looks great and is also a round-point, which is a lot more forgiving in terms of cutting your face while learning.
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    Living and Dying in Time JBHoren's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJC View Post
    For strops I'm a huge fan of the SRD Modular - when you mess up (and you will) you can replace the damaged surface for a fraction of the cost.
    And I use the system with felt pads and diamond spray to maintain the edge.
    A big +1 on the SRD Modular strop. In addition to the important reasons MJC mentioned, I'd like to add that the SRD Modular strop totally eliminates any problems with how tight/loose you pull the strop -- unlike a hanging strop, you don't put any tension on it -- which means no worries about edge curl (which causes one to nick the strop), and makes it much less possible/probable to mess-up the blade edge. The Modular strop is also significantly shorter than a hanging strop, which gives a built-in "brake" on the speed with which you strop -- that blade isn't going to "run away from you". Finally, the SRD Modular strop is compact and functional, so you don't have to worry about if/where/how to hang it during use, and it stores easily (where others, like curious brothers 'n sisters, can't get at it).

    You can't miss, with this!

    Smooth shaving!
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    Senior Member kwlfca's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJC View Post

    For strops I'm a huge fan of the SRD Modular - when you mess up (and you will) you can replace the damaged surface for a fraction of the cost.
    +2, such a good product!

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