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Thread: Latest custom builds

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    Senior Member ncraigtrn's Avatar
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    I drew a line from the center of the spine to the edge splitting the blade in half. I then drew a line splitting the frame in half perpendicular to the edge. From the intersection you have to sides of a right triangle. Your side opposite and your side adjacent. 8mm and 29 mm respectively. Using the pathagorean theorem we find the hypotenuse to be 30.08 mm which gives us the the distance from the point of contact on the hone to the edge.

    Now to find the half angle I used the equation

    Sin(x)=opposite/hypotenuse
    Where x= halft the cutting angle.

    So simplified this is x=sin^-1(8/3.08)
    X=15.42į

    Being that's the half angle. We multiply by 2 giving us a whopping 30.84į
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    Senior Member ncraigtrn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharptonn View Post
    Thought of this! Leveled up workbench. Laid flat. Came up with 30 degrees. Divide x 2??

    Attachment 172360Attachment 172361
    No that's the included angle. Dividing would give you the half angle. 30.84 is what I got using trig. So that's close enough.
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    " Atta Boy!!" sharptonn's Avatar
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    OK proper pics this time! Leveled the workbench surface. Frameback to edge sez 30 degrees. Would we not divide this by 2??

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    Senior Member silverloaf's Avatar
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    lets agree to say 30 degrees and apologize for hijacking this thread in a big way! haha, SORRY!!!
    fun stuff though.
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    Silverloaf

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    Senior Member ncraigtrn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverloaf View Post
    lets agree to say 30 degrees and apologize for hijacking this thread in a big way! haha, SORRY!!!
    fun stuff though.
    But think of the education anyone concerned with blade geometry just received...... But yea sorry for hijacking the thread
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  8. #56
    Senior Member silverloaf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharptonn View Post
    OK proper pics this time! Leveled the workbench surface. Frameback to edge sez 30 degrees. Would we not divide this by 2??

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    no, you nailed it right there tom! no dividing, that shows the effective cutting/honing angle the way you did it. i apologize for speaking ill of the little bubble, it didn't lie afterall!
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    Silverloaf

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    Senior Member silverloaf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3Drew101 View Post
    Hello guys,

    Iíll just drop the last three custom straights on for you to have a look at

    The first one is a Japanese kamisori style (although westernised), the blade was a full wedge and measured 8/8Ē, the blade guard is natural horn with pewter wedges fastened with a leather cord and chromed toggle.
    Attachment 171847Attachment 171848Attachment 171846
    The second was modelled on a Wade & Butcher barbers use I was working on, the blade is a 9/8Ē wedge and to give it a little extra grip I cut some jimps into the spine, natural horn scales and pewter wedge
    Attachment 171851Attachment 171852Attachment 171850
    And the third one is the prettiest razor Iíve made to date, itís a 8/8Ē wedge with natural horn scales, pewter wedge and Iíve double pinned it on the wedge end.
    Attachment 171853Attachment 171854Attachment 171855


    All made from O1 tool steel three times heat treated and oil quenched then tempered at 150deg c (300deg f) to achieve a rockwell of C62 ish.

    Iíve got to admit Iím really loving making these razors and Iím getting really good so I think Iím going to keep going and make as many as I can.
    i really do like the design of your fixed blade and very clever idea for the sheath/cover! i have several fixed blades designs that ive not settled on storage ideas for. my thoughts leaned towards stands for them or fitted boxes but i really like your idea. it reminds me of an axe with a sheath, very neat. keep on making and showing, you have a good eye for attractive design. the geometry part is the most important aspect outside of heat treat when it comes to having a serviceable and reliable blade for generations to use. i started off by mimicking vintage blades and though my designs can be far from vintage looking my geometry still follows suit with the old guys. they worked it out and knew what they were doing didn't they? one of the aspects of their geometry is that the spine and cutting edge should wear away at the same rate and maintain the same cutting angle through the razors entire life. a slight hollow helps wedges in this regard, not accumulating too much wear and making honing a bear! it also highlights the fact that needing many layers of tape will prove difficult for future users to maintain the proper angle and ease of sharpening. as it wears away the cutting edge you will shorten the height of the blade and need fewer layers as time progresses. it will undoubtedly be a chore for the user to maintain proper angle as time goes by and the need to remove a layer now and then.
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    Silverloaf

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    " Atta Boy!!" sharptonn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverloaf View Post
    lets agree to say 30 degrees and apologize for hijacking this thread in a big way! haha, SORRY!!!
    fun stuff though.
    Quote Originally Posted by ncraigtrn View Post
    But think of the education anyone concerned with blade geometry just received...... But yea sorry for hijacking the thread
    Indeed. So the blade angle is the sum of the whole thing, and not one side? I figured it to be one side. I think perhaps Tarkus and ncraigtrn thought the same as I did! In THAT case, EVERYONE was right, sorta, kinda.

    For giggles, a Wade and Butcher hollow ground with no appreciable wear!

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    Oh! I give the credit of hijacking to Bruno! HE started it!
    Last edited by sharptonn; 07-10-2014 at 04:55 PM.
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  13. #59
    Senior Member ncraigtrn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharptonn View Post
    Indeed. So the blade angle is the sum of the whole thing, and not one side? I figured it to be one side. I think perhaps Tarkus and ncraigtrn though the same as I did! In THAT case, EVERYONE was right, sorta, kinda.

    Oh! I give the credit of hijacking to Bruno! HE started it!
    Truthfully I think its the larger sum of the two half angles. Because the pitch of the angle on top is as important as on the hone. I'd imagine if you took a straight and your bubble finder you'd see the included angle to be in the 15-22 range.
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