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Thread: The French Love of A Mouton Rouge (by moutonrouge)

  1. #21
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    I have a strange feeling I know you from somwhere my friend)

  2. #22
    Senior Member blabbermouth ejmolitor37's Avatar
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    Wow all of this is just great work. Thanks for sharing, I'll follow this.
    Nothing is fool proof, to a sufficiently talented fool...

  3. #23
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    @ovidiucotiga - I have the certitude, a small world. I decided to stick to the neighborhood that expressed interest. Maggard simply showed the way (and I'm grateful) and I want to see how far the rabbit's hole can go. Who knows, whoever might be interested , might find the Wonderland. Out of solidarity and French heritage, I feel obliged to share the excerpts with the French colleagues.

  4. #24
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    Some further progression today, just enough to start using the scale as template for the other. Filing the contour turn out to be a bit challenging but the shape has started to take off. From now on, there is no need to keep updating all the small steps, you got the idea. It might take a couple of weeks of on/off work to get the scale ready for inlaying and I'll get back then.



    One pin is off centric because the scale slipped.






  5. #25
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    I was talking/writing the other day about two ways to secure the inlay using a pin. I am not sure if these are the correct terms, tinkering of this sort is not my field of expertise. There might be other ways but these two I figured out, tested and stood the test of regular use
    - the "cold" technique - simple, straight forward, hiding the pin by the means of a good polish, not suitable for ornate inlays but can be done indoors, quietly and keeping missus happy
    - the "hot" technique - soldering the pin to the inlay - great for ornate inlays but not suitable for indoors if missus is about
    Here is another old project I decided to modify / make it look better and more artistic. I thought that complicating it even more with some ornate inlays (obtained by cutting a silver bracelet into more essential parts) would make a great addition.

    Overall appearance before I get the inlaying started



    Close up



    After I carve the cavity to house the inlay, the hole for the pin will be beveled to accommodate the joint (easier that filing to get it flushed)



    The same will be done for the MOP scales when ready

  6. #26
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    In the end, is something like this




  7. The Following User Says Thank You to moutonrouge For This Useful Post:

    RezDog (08-25-2017)

  8. #27
    Senior Member blabbermouth ejmolitor37's Avatar
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    Boy these are amazing, and such high class work. Thank you for sharing. Green with envy am I: )
    Nothing is fool proof, to a sufficiently talented fool...

  9. #28
    Senior Member blabbermouth nicknbleeding's Avatar
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    Wow. Your work is great

    Sent from my SM-J700P using Tapatalk

  10. #29
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    I pretty much finished, I tried to correct the errors as much as I could. I have only left to secure the panels for the second scale and insert the inlays. To avoid confusions with the other types of MOP, I did use freshwater MOP (I like its colour - resembles bone china)








  11. #30
    Senior Member blabbermouth ejmolitor37's Avatar
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    Very beautiful work, just love the classic style of it. How thick are these scales? Just curious as to how flexible of a material this is.
    Nothing is fool proof, to a sufficiently talented fool...

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