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Thread: Meat cleaver restoration

  1. #41
    "My words are of iron..."
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    Nice! And by the way, any plans you have to take that blade to Japan....leave it at home. With the hamon, you'd never be allowed to bring it into the country. I mean, just in case this becomes a knife you have to use everyday...
    "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." A. Lincoln.

  2. #42
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    Really? You can't bring blades with a Hamon into Japan?
    I would think that noone would mistake this with a real Japanese blade.

    This is the first time I did something like this, and I was not sure how detailed the shape of the blade would trail the clay line.
    That is why I kept it simple. As you can see, the way the actual hamon matches the clay line in 1 smooth line is uncanny.
    Now I just need to get my hands on more carbon steel...
    ScottGoodman likes this.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  3. #43
    Paladin, Trusted Warrior of God thunderman's Avatar
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    Very, very cool.

  4. #44
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    I finally finished the cleaver.
    I gave it a light etch to protect it against rust, and to highlight the hamon.
    The handle was made Japanese style: I took 2 planks of meranti which were scrap from an old window. I carved out the shape of the tangon both sides, and then glued it together. (sorry, no pics of that). For the ferrule I used a cut off from brass water piping which I found in my basement. I sanded it clean, and then used a blowtorch to gave the surface a weathered look. With a chisel I shaepd the handle so that the ferrule would fit snugly.
    I then treated the handle with linseed oil.

    I learned a ton, making this knife, and made a good number of mistakes.
    There's a couple of things I am not entirely happy with.
    Still, At the least I ended up with a usable, very sharp knife.
    And most importantly: I had a ton of fun doing this. Special thanks to Mike Blue for patiently answering all of my questions.



    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Bruno For This Useful Post:

    KindestCutOfAll (04-06-2012), ScottGoodman (01-03-2012), spazola (01-02-2012)

  6. #45
    Senior Member sinnfein's Avatar
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    Very nice, what a huge transformation from what it started as
    -dan-

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