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Thread: Project Genco..

  1. #1
    Just a guy with free time.
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    Default Project Genco..

    I got this razor a long time ago, and had really just used it as something to experiment on. It's seen a treadle operated grinding wheel, assorted machinist stones, sandpaper, greaseless compound, a 1500 grit sanding drum, then the same drum with green polishing compound on it. Not in any particular order mind you...it was all just experimentation over the course of a few months. As you can see from the before pic. She was very ill when I got her. The finish isn't consistent, and I still don't think it'll be anybody's treasured razor, but it does hone easily, and shave great. So here it is, for all the world to see. Very few razors are too far gone I guess. I never intended to put it back together, but I noticed one day that it really was quite shiny, and I had all my abrasives questions answered with everything I put it through. Seemed only fair to put it in scales and try a shave.
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    Magpie (01-22-2012)

  3. #2
    The First Cut is the Deepest! Magpie's Avatar
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    Dont think it will ever be treasured? Gift it to a young man (son, grandson?) who does not yet need a razor, but soon will. I think its Great that you put it back to use!
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    regularjoe (01-22-2012)

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    Member Str8Raz0r's Avatar
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    The value of a razor is not tied to its appearance alone, but with its function also. It looks fine and it shaves well so, well done.

    Stu

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    regularjoe (01-22-2012)

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    Senior Member blabbermouth Joed's Avatar
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    To Regularjoe: We get many questions here on SRP about restorations. Can you give us a guess as to how much time in work was out into this project? Would you have paid to have this work done? What was the grind on the razor before you started?

    Here is a similar project I worked on a while ago. It was a wedge so there was enough metal available to remove the devil's spit and still have a working razor when I finished. This razor would have been really expensive if I had paid someone to do the work for me. Restored Smiling Wedge in Cocobolo wood
    “If you always do what you always did, you will always get what you always got.” (A. Einstein)

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    regularjoe (01-22-2012)

  9. #5
    Senior Member Tsunami's Avatar
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    I think your experimentation you did well! Put some scales on it and hone it up.

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    regularjoe (01-22-2012)

  11. #6
    Just a guy with free time.
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    We get many questions here on SRP about restorations. Can you give us a guess as to how much time in work was out into this project? Would you have paid to have this work done? What was the grind on the razor before you started?
    Joed:Well, back when all I had was a treadle, I did spend a fair amount of time fiddling with it. I'd bet I spent a few hours at that alone. A fair guess would be 10-15 hours total working time. But it's really not done from the viewpoint of a paid restorer. I don't think this would be acceptable if someone were to pay for the work to be done. And I'd have made the finish even, but I wasn't sure it would hold an edge for long. Which brings us to the grind. It was a hollow ground blade when I started, and still is. Takes a fair amount of finesse to pull it off, but being on a treadle instead of a 3750 rpm grinder does make it less likely to eat the blade in a split second.

    A less wordy response:10-15 hours. No I wouldn't pay someone for the work unless it was an heirloom(effectively making it priceless IMO). Full Hollow Ground. Only time will tell if the edge will hold. I'm glad you all like it. Thanks!

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    Joed (01-22-2012)

  13. #7
    Excited Member AxelH's Avatar
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    If it shaves anything like my equivalent Geneva it was definitely worth it.

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    regularjoe (01-22-2012)

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    Senior Member 1971Wedge's Avatar
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    Real story here is, it was definately a big effort on your part, plus....it's a save.

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    regularjoe (01-23-2012)

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