Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: single malt

  1. #1
    Senior Member matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    Posts
    655
    Thanked: 1

    Default single malt

    Sitting down with a glass of single malt scotch, how much on average would you drink? Does scotch loose it;s flavor after you have had a few? I mean your ability to taste it. I know after I drink a few beers taste kind of looses out to, Let's finsih this beer so I can have another.

  2. #2
    Shaves like a pirate jockeys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    DFW, TX
    Posts
    2,423
    Thanked: 590

    Default

    3 fingers. but I'm a big guy and a raging alcoholic to boot, so I'm definitely still tasting and enjoying by the end of the glass.

    eta: it usually takes me an hour to drink it.
    Last edited by jockeys; 05-29-2008 at 07:33 PM.

  3. #3
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,809
    Thanked: 3982
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    1 finger on average. Usually a couple of times per week.
    Occasionally 2 fingers over a long evening.
    Very rarely 3 fingers, like after a bbq when I am sitting in front of a campfire with a good friend, talking about everything and nothing.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  4. #4
    . Bill S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Richfield, Ohio
    Posts
    2,521
    Thanked: 597

    Default

    For me a typical pour is a couple of fingers in a tulip shaped whisky glass. Repeat as needed.

    The last sip is as good as the first, as far as I can tell.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Advance Missouri
    Posts
    30
    Thanked: 1

    Default

    Three fingers of Single Malt Irish (love the stuff!!!)

    Two fingers of Single Malt Scotch.

    Last drops as good as the first!

  6. #6
    Senior Member drfred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Midland, TX
    Posts
    237
    Thanked: 6

    Default

    I used to (not any more!) have a hand of my favorite single-malt, but I , too, am a very large guy. Maybe that is why I slowed down so much???

    Fred

  7. #7
    Member artilleryo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Tigard, OR
    Posts
    51
    Thanked: 6

    Default

    I'll usually go with two or three fingers of single malt.

    However, I've found that a good scotch taken neat in a cognac glass is almost sublime. It didn't even occur to me until I did this out of necessity (my cognac glass was the only one clean at the time). I never really thought of scotch as having a nose like cognac, but it does.

  8. #8
    Senior Member matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    Posts
    655
    Thanked: 1

    Default

    I just had a few fingers of Glenlivet 12 yr old single malt. This is my second scotch and I really liked it. I noted a taste of apples and malty spice. I also got some Duvel beer but it is still chilling in the fridge. The scotch was very good though, I think I am a new fan. Anyone know why a particular scotch would have the taste of apples? What do the distilleries do to make it have such a unique taste?
    Last edited by matt; 06-04-2008 at 12:07 AM.

  9. #9
    Shaves like a pirate jockeys's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    DFW, TX
    Posts
    2,423
    Thanked: 590

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by matt View Post
    I just had a few fingers of Glenlivet 12 yr old single malt. This is my second scotch and I really liked it. I noted a taste of apples and malty spice. I also got some Duvel beer but it is still chilling in the fridge. The scotch was very good though, I think I am a new fan. Anyone know why a particular scotch would have the taste of apples? What do the distilleries do to make it have such a unique taste?
    there are only a few thousand factors that influence the whisky :-D but here are a few:

    1. the raw ingredients - which grains harvested from where that cross-pollinated with what can make a huge difference
    2. the water the distillery uses. some whiskies tastes STRONGLY of peat because of this. I don't care for them, but you owe it to yourself to try at least one "peaty" whisky
    3. the stills used. the shape, size, material, etc of this changes the character of the whisky. the Scots are so picky about this, legend has it that when an old still is replaced, the brew master will take a hammer and make dents in the new one to match the ones in the old one.
    4. by far the biggest factor is the barrels in which the whisky is aged. remember, it was in the barrel for a decade or two. (more if you are drinking the really good stuff) the whisky will pick up a lot of flavor from the barrel, so the barrel material is important. also, sometimes the barrels were used for something else beforehand, so they will impart a hint of whatever the previous contents were to the flavor.
    5. some distilleries are known for their unique flavors. my favorite example of this is Dalwinnie, which is a distillery that puts a bit of honeysuckle in their whisky, resulting in an interesting sweetness in finish.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Arthur Dent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    112
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    I pour a "scotch maker" every once and while. "That'a a shot of scotch, dropped into a larger glass of scotch. Now scotch me scotch face." Ted Kennedy, Robot Chicken.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •