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    Default Growing your own saffron

    I am having 40 Crocus sativus cashmirianus (= Kashmir saffron crocus) corms on the way from a botanical garden. These are the source of the rare Mongra or Lacha saffron. I am very excited and looking forward to growing my own saffron.

    Has anyone else tried to grow their own saffron? Any tips and tricks for growing them in a temperate climate?
    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose. Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr.

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    Forum mogwai thebigspendur's Avatar
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    You know, because of the cost and tremendous profit involved in the Saffron trade if the syndicate finds out your growing your own you'll be wearing a new pair of cement overshoes at the bottom of the Harbor.
    Why I'm so good with a pistol I could kill a crow on the wing. Did the crow have a pistol? Was he shooting back? I will be.

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    Str8 & Loving It BladeRunner001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kees View Post
    I am having 40 Crocus sativus cashmirianus (= Kashmir saffron crocus) corms on the way from a botanical garden. These are the source of the rare Mongra or Lacha saffron. I am very excited and looking forward to growing my own saffron.

    Has anyone else tried to grow their own saffron? Any tips and tricks for growing them in a temperate climate?
    That's interesting...We use Saffron in cooking, a lot in fact, but rather than buy our own, we rely on our contacts in the middle east for getting high quality on the cheap.

    Have fun with this project...Growing stuff is always fun .

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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigspendur View Post
    You know, because of the cost and tremendous profit involved in the Saffron trade if the syndicate finds out your growing your own you'll be wearing a new pair of cement overshoes at the bottom of the Harbor.
    Who's gonna tell . Not me, no sir!

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    Scale Maniac BKratchmer's Avatar
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    I know NOTHING about the process except that it takes a LOT of stamens to make enough saffron to do anything.... but that sounds like a really cool project! Pictures and stories would be much appreciated as you do this!

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    Carbon-steel-aholic DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    I'm with ya on this, but wonder how long it can be sustained. Guess it would be dependant on your needs

    It has been something I've wanted to try myself

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    Member OiRogers's Avatar
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    Well... I'm interested.

    My contact in Bolivia for good Saffron has returned to the states and I find myself having to pay exorbitant prices for the stuff to keep my supply up.

    Is it possible to grow the stuff indoors in pots?.. If so, I may have to take up gardening.

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    You can grow them in pots, which is espcially recommended when you have wet summers. During aestivation the corms will rot when the soil is too wet. You can of course dig them up as well as soon as the foliage starts to die down.
    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose. Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr.

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