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Thread: Anyone out there into Muzzleloading?

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    Member JDCAL29's Avatar
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    Default Anyone out there into Muzzleloading?

    Hi all,
    After an unsuccessful year of deer hunting in Minnesota, I decided to look into Muzzleloaders. In Minnesota, the Muzzleload season runs from Nov 26-Dec 11. I talked to a friend that muzzleloads and also someone at work, and they both love it, and said that if you aren't bothered by the cold, go for it. I am told that not as many people do it, so WMAs are less crowded, however the deer can be picked over by that time.

    Cabelas is running a special on a gun called a Traditions Canyon. It's a .50 CAL and for $179, you get the gun, the case, and a starter kit. It sounds like a pretty good deal to me. Does anyone have any advice on what to look for in a Muzzleloader? I own an 12 GA, 30.06 and .22, and was able to make educated purchases, but muzzleloading is a whole new ballgame for me.

    Thanks,
    Jim

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    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
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    OY, I know a bit about the older versions, as in I have a .50 cal Flintlock Pennsylvania Long made by Traditions that is a ton of fun, I also have a .50 cal Hawkins, an old one from CVA that is a Percussion Side-lock that is a bit more of a hunter... I would not consider either of them as a serious hunter at any range over 75 yards myself.. They also get very un-reliable in the cold and wet conditions...
    So there is a bit of a challenge, and a link to the past, I only hunted with the Hawkins for Elk in Colorado but it was dang well freezing and I never got close enough to try for a shot

    I have no knowledge of the newer 209 ignition systems other than what I read, they seem to be almost a Hybrid of a Muzzleloader and a Centerfire in my eyes.. I know they claim some impressive groups out to 200 yards, but I have never tried them...
    Sorry I could not be more help
    Last edited by gssixgun; 11-19-2011 at 06:00 PM.

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    Senior Member ronnie brown's Avatar
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    yes i have a cva inline 50 cal . it will shoot 150 grains of black powder but it has a better patern with 100 grain and has a 100 yard kill zone in the rain i turn the gun upside down with the barrel down ,and it is a blast to hunt with, over the years i have taken about 12 deer with it.

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    It really depends on how interested you are in the historical aspect as opposed to just extending your hunting season. I started with muzzleloaders as a way to extend my hunting season, back before modern inlines. It has been an absolute game changer for me. I no longer own any modern firearms, and in fact, muzzleloading has sparked an interest in historical reenacting.

    You can usually find me in the woods with my fowling piece. It's a 20-bore (.62 caliber) flintlock with a 42" barrel. Of course for deer I load with a round ball with flax tow for wadding. For birds or small game I load shot with the same tow wadding. It's only a 50-yard gun, but for NJ whitetails, that's all I need.


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    Senior Member eflatminor's Avatar
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    I'm a bow guy when it comes to deer but I did use a friend's muzzleloader once back in the 80s. Someday I'll get into it I suspect but I'm more focused on upland birds these days, with a nice 28 gauge double.

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    Senior Member eflatminor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fyrfyter43 View Post
    It really depends on how interested you are in the historical aspect as opposed to just extending your hunting season. I started with muzzleloaders as a way to extend my hunting season, back before modern inlines. It has been an absolute game changer for me. I no longer own any modern firearms, and in fact, muzzleloading has sparked an interest in historical reenacting.

    You can usually find me in the woods with my fowling piece. It's a 20-bore (.62 caliber) flintlock with a 42" barrel. Of course for deer I load with a round ball with flax tow for wadding. For birds or small game I load shot with the same tow wadding. It's only a 50-yard gun, but for NJ whitetails, that's all I need.

    My goodness that's gorgeous...you almost want to lick it!
    MickR likes this.

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    By the way, despite what a lot of folks think about muzzleloaders (and specifically flintlocks), they are very reliable. I've hunted in all kinds of weather from September squirrels - mid February late deer season, including rain, snow, sleet, and freezing rain with a flintlock. I've only had one misfire, and that was my own fault. I brought my gun inside the warm house overnight with a charge in the barrel. The change in temperature caused condensation in the bore, which wet my powder.

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    Senior Member Str8Shooter's Avatar
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    the new inline ones are fantastic. with the right powder and sabot bullet in 50 cal I can do 3" group at 200 yards. Thomposon Center is what I use. It really is a blackpowder sniping rifle. With blackhorn 209 powder, harvestor Scorpion Pt Gold 300Gr Sabot it is a monster. I weigh out my powder by weight not volume. By volume its 110 gr. By weight it's 74gr. I'll post a pic when I can get to my files on the main computer. Not hooked up after the move yet. The Blackhorn 209 is more energetic then 777. No crud ring etc.
    Paul
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    Smooth Operator MrDavid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fyrfyter43 View Post
    You can usually find me in the woods with my fowling piece. It's a 20-bore (.62 caliber) flintlock with a 42" barrel. Of course for deer I load with a round ball with flax tow for wadding. For birds or small game I load shot with the same tow wadding. It's only a 50-yard gun, but for NJ whitetails, that's all I need.
    fyrfyter43,

    I'm not even a hunter, but that gun is absolutely stunning. Makes me want to take up muzzleloading. Nicely done, sir!

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    Senior Member scrapcan's Avatar
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    If you get into muzzleloading and want to use a roundball and black powder ( not substitutes) you should look into the Dutch Shultz black powder accuracy secrets. He has some good stuff to pass along.

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