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Thread: stock thickness

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    Default stock thickness

    I have a couple of German razors that are in the 6/8 range. the bigger one is more like 9/16. They have a spine thickness of around .175-.180 for the smaller one and .200 at the thickest part on the larger one. In the experience of the makers on here, are those good stock sizes for making modern custom 6/8 blades? I ask because I talked with the US sales guy from Voestalpine Precision Strip, formerly Bohler-Uddeholm Strip, yesterday and he told me that they will be shipping AEB-L in .175 and .198-.200 to one of the knife making suppliers in January. Could be fun.
    Last edited by JDM61; 12-11-2015 at 03:44 AM.

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    aka shooter74743 ScottGoodman's Avatar
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    I buy nothing but .250 x 1 stock for my razors. If I want a larger razor I will just draw out the blade a little. I use a gas forge, so all I mess with is 1095 & O-1. I did order some 15n20 with my last shipment about 6 months ago for when I feel industrious and want to try a laminated steel. Still sitting is the "stock corner".
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    Unfortunately, .200 or, actually, .1965 is about as thick as they can go on the AEB-L. Forge welding that stuff, even to itself, apparently has a bit of a learning curve. If you are interested, the guy also said that they are talking about 15N20 stock in sizes up to 6mm (.243) maybe this coming summer. Voestalpine's strip steel division is not set up for super thick stock for obvious reasons, but their new mill in Austria can run this moderately thick stuff. it handles the bigger stock while the Swedish mill primarily produces the razor and thin bandsaw stock up to mourned .065.
    Quote Originally Posted by shooter74743 View Post
    I buy nothing but .250 x 1 stock for my razors. If I want a larger razor I will just draw out the blade a little. I use a gas forge, so all I mess with is 1095 & O-1. I did order some 15n20 with my last shipment about 6 months ago for when I feel industrious and want to try a laminated steel. Still sitting is the "stock corner".

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    aka shooter74743 ScottGoodman's Avatar
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    Can you weld it? A couple pieces of .200 would end up ok after a little hammer time
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    Yes, but the problem is that the few guys who are really good at forge welding stainless like that tend to be a rather tight lipped about their process. The only tutorial that I have seen is by a guy from Argentina and he was using lower carbon stuff to make damascus jewelry IIRC. You don't have the huge amount of info out here like you do for forge welding carbon steel. There is some info about how to make san mai with a carbon core and low carbon stainless cladding like 410 or 416, but it isn't an easy process from what I have read.
    Quote Originally Posted by shooter74743 View Post
    Can you weld it? A couple pieces of .200 would end up ok after a little hammer time
    Last edited by JDM61; 12-13-2015 at 05:03 PM.
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    An hour of trying is worth more in terms of learning experience than multiple hours of talking about it.
    It's steel, after all. Heat it and beat it.
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    Bruno, in my case it is heat it and beat it again. I kinda discouraged myself a while back when it came to that stainless clad san mai. Have to get some more thicker 410 or 416.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    An hour of trying is worth more in terms of learning experience than multiple hours of talking about it.
    It's steel, after all. Heat it and beat it.

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    In my experience, thicker layers are a lot easier.
    I also crown the bars a bit, so that when I start hitting, everything (scale, flux etc) is driven out, starting from the middle.
    That, and liberal amounts of borax between each heat until the piece is solid.
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    With stainless, you have to have an oxygen free environment on the surfaces you are welding. I tried MIG welding the seams, but my crappy little flux core wire welder was not up to the task. Next time, i will be using either a canister or a couple of layers of the high temp heat treat foil to seal up the stack. I use kerosene and borax on my carbon damascus and I have used the foil for "tile welding" mosaic so I didn't get the little white lines between the pieces.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    In my experience, thicker layers are a lot easier.
    I also crown the bars a bit, so that when I start hitting, everything (scale, flux etc) is driven out, starting from the middle.
    That, and liberal amounts of borax between each heat until the piece is solid.
    Last edited by JDM61; 12-14-2015 at 04:13 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JDM61 View Post
    I have a couple of German razors that are in the 6/8 range. the bigger one is more like 9/16. They have a spine thickness of around .175-.180 for the smaller one and .200 at the thickest part on the larger one. In the experience of the makers on here, are those good stock sizes for making modern custom 6/8 blades?
    What would make you think that the bevel angles would be different for 'modern' razors?

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