Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
Like Tree28Likes

Thread: My power hammer :p

  1. #1
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,810
    Thanked: 3982
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default My power hammer :p

    Well, not really. Lately I have been focusing on laminating steel and making things that look more interesting than monosteel. One of the side effects is the need to draw out thick billets. The first couple of times I did this with a hand hammer, which takes ages and causes lots of scale loss.

    Last time I had a friend come over to be a striker. It was a lot of good fun and we made him a laminated knife. The problem is of course that this is not something I can do whenever it suits me, and while he means well, he doesn't hammer quite as hard, fast, or precise as I would want. That is logical of course. So I kept thinking about a better (faster) way to turn a thick billet into usable stock.

    I spent the entire Friday afternoon tinkering in my shop, trying out several things, scrapping and rebuilding it as I went along. I welded, cut, and welded again. The result is butt ugly, but after today I know it works really well.

    Basically, it is a hardy tool that is slotted for a 30 mm wide bar of stock (which I use as a center steel for my billets for now) and which uses threaded rod to clamp the bar to the bottom plate of the hardy tool. The fit is exact, so when the bar is in there, there is literally no wiggle room. First I do the initial hand welds with a hand hammer to make sure that everything sticks together. The I repeatedly bring the billet to welding heat, clamp it in, and beat the billet with a sledge hammer. As soon as the color drops below yellow, I release the clamp and reheat. This worked very well. Initial heating and welds aside, I drew out a 1" thick billet to less than 3/8 in half an hour. The additional benefit is that the bigger surface of the sledgehammer means that the surface will be pretty flat instead of dished.

    I'll have to make a couple more of these things. At least one or two for when I use 25 mm stock or 20 mm stock. And then another for when I work with square 10 mm bar which was welded to a billet.

    Name:  hammer_hardy2.jpg
Views: 264
Size:  37.1 KB

    Name:  hammer_hardy.jpg
Views: 281
Size:  21.9 KB
    spazola, lz6, Geezer and 15 others like this.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bruno For This Useful Post:

    Slawman (01-20-2016), spazola (12-23-2015)

  3. #2
    " Atta Boy!!" sharptonn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    18,195
    Thanked: 5823

    Default

    I think that is quite ingenious, Bruno!
    (I also feel much better about my welding! )
    Geezer, rolodave and Chevhead like this.

  4. #3
    Senior Member blabbermouth 10Pups's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Across the street from Mickey Mouse in Calif.
    Posts
    5,312
    Thanked: 1153

    Default

    Bruno, it's not the looks , it's that you got to where you wanted to be by building something that works. Can't tell you how many butt ugly tools I have made. Try and buy a 6" wrench or a vice that holds a 300 pound hydraulic ram.
    Good going :<0)
    Good judgment comes from experience, and experience....well that comes from poor judgment.

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    504
    Thanked: 49

    Default

    That is one sturdy looking hold down fixture, Mr. Bruno!!!! Nice work.

  6. #5
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,810
    Thanked: 3982
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    One of the side effects of laminating steel, is that afterwards, the effects of the hammering is visible in the layer patterns. With only 5 layers, this is pretty distinct. And this tells me a lot about the flaws in my techniques, flaws that will never be obvious with monosteel, except during heat treatment perhaps.
    Geezer likes this.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  7. #6
    Senior Member Gipson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Ukraine
    Posts
    496
    Thanked: 183

    Default

    The more you work, the more you get experience. Sometimes the result is pleasing, and sometimes not. But the road by walking.

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    504
    Thanked: 49

    Default

    As best as I can tell, a small rolling mill like a McDonald design is about the only "home shop" way to get layers that are close to "straight". Some folks do say that a press will not distort "enough" but those guys have nice big presses that take big bites, I suspect. My small one distorts the pattern pretty nicely.
    skipnord likes this.

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    East Central Illinois
    Posts
    650
    Thanked: 82

    Lightbulb

    If you could come up with some type of a quick clamp & release Clamp"Does that make sense??" It would give you more time at welding heat. I have seen some foot operated clamping devices. Just a thought.

    Slawman
    Last edited by Slawman; 01-20-2016 at 02:09 PM. Reason: Another idea.

  10. #9
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,810
    Thanked: 3982
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slawman View Post
    If you could come up with some type of a quick clamp & release Clamp"Does that make sense??" It would give you more time at welding heat. I have seen some foot operated clamping devices. Just a thought.

    Slawman
    I've considered that. I've tried a couple of variations as well.
    The thing is that as long as the steel does not touch the anvil solidly, it doesn't lose heat quickly enough to be a problem.
    And quickrelease mechanisms often have a problem with snapping open or allowing wiggle room when the billet is under heavy impact.

    If you don't open the clamp more than is needed, then closing it is pretty quick as well.
    Slawman likes this.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  11. #10
    Senior Member criswilson10's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Easley, SC, USA
    Posts
    1,564
    Thanked: 370

    Default

    Nice idea, I can think of several uses for that on my anvil and I will be copying your design.

    I don't do laminated steel yet, but for a quick set and release clamp that will hold up to the banging, take a look at a carpentry hold fast.
    Some people never go crazy. What truly horrible lives they must lead - Charles Bukowski

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •