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Thread: Oxy acetalene forging?

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    Nautical Madman SailorJ's Avatar
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    Default Oxy acetalene forging?

    Don't have a forge set up yet, but I do have a OA setup. Did some searches and didn't see anything specifically regarding trying to heat the metal for forging with the torch, cutting or brazing tip.

    Can proper forging be accomplished through this method or are there reasons in the outcome (not economic, I understand propane/ other fuels are less expensive)

    Thanks in advance!

    Julian


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    Senior Member blabbermouth tcrideshd's Avatar
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    One of those guys will come along soon enough, but I can see cost as a difference for sure. Maybe not getting even heat on your steel too, having to heat it in several spots instead of a forge which heats everything fairly even. Tc
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcrideshd View Post
    One of those guys will come along...
    Blacksmiths are respected, not necessarily respectable.

    The cost of Oxyacet has been mentioned, so that's over with.

    But, forging metal requires heat and cares little for the source. Potentially adjustment of the ratio of oxygen to gas can positively or negatively affect the carbon content of the steel being worked. Getting useful work done, without wasting time or precious resources, depends on Controlling the Heat, focusing it into a specific spot or band and yet leaving several hands free to manipulate other things like the work or tools without having to waste time in other maneuvers.

    I might suggest finding a piece of soft firebrick that you can bore a chamber into. Like this: $30 Micro Forge | Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers There are a lot of online demos for building a simple one to two brick forge. You can easily fabricate a holder for the torch tip. Once adjusted you want to heat the brick not the metal anyway. The brick re-radiates into the metal more evening than the spot heat of the torch....

    The forge is a tool for holding heat. Holding a torch, shutting it down, grabbing tongs etc. then moving to the hammer/anvil, is all Time that allows the metal to cool and less work get done.

    I hope this makes sense.

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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Working as a welder most of my life, I've done plenty of bending, straightening, light forging, and minor heat treating with Oxy Acetylene. If your doing more than one heat, handling of the torch is problematic, and expense is a significant factor. With that said, go ahead and do a little bit of it. It will just get you to the point of building a proper forge quicker.

    I should have mentioned that for tiny jobs I usually use a cutting tip, or one of the larger welding tips. Sometimes the ability to localize the heat is an advantage, bending comes to mind. For bigger jobs a rosebud tip will give higher BTU output. If you are aiming a rosebud into a confined area, overheating and back pressure are both problematic.
    Last edited by bluesman7; 04-26-2016 at 07:28 PM.
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    Incidere in dimidium Cangooner's Avatar
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    I'll just add that using a torch can be fantastically useful when you need to heat/forge a specific part of a project. For example, I forged a rose a while back and used a torch to heat the end of the stem for peening to attach the petals, etc. So for something like that, it can be great. But unless you follow Mike's suggestion to use the torch as the heat source within a forge, it would be (IMHO) very limiting and frustrating to use the torch alone for general forging.

    For an alternative, do some googling for brake drum forges. They can be quick and cheap to build, and not too pricey to operate using coal or charcoal.

    Good luck!

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    Nautical Madman SailorJ's Avatar
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    I figured even heating would be a possible issue, glad to hear that it's at least possible.

    I intend to build something full size when we move to our new location, but right now I have a OA system to play with if I get the opportunity.

    Thank you for the responses!


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    Senior Member blabbermouth tcrideshd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Blue View Post
    Blacksmiths are respected, not necessarily respectable.

    The cost of Oxyacet has been mentioned, so that's over with.

    But, forging metal requires heat and cares little for the source. Potentially adjustment of the ratio of oxygen to gas can positively or negatively affect the carbon content of the steel being worked. Getting useful work done, without wasting time or precious resources, depends on Controlling the Heat, focusing it into a specific spot or band and yet leaving several hands free to manipulate other things like the work or tools without having to waste time in other maneuvers.

    I might suggest finding a piece of soft firebrick that you can bore a chamber into. Like this: $30 Micro Forge | Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers There are a lot of online demos for building a simple one to two brick forge. You can easily fabricate a holder for the torch tip. Once adjusted you want to heat the brick not the metal anyway. The brick re-radiates into the metal more evening than the spot heat of the torch....

    The forge is a tool for holding heat. Holding a torch, shutting it down, grabbing tongs etc. then moving to the hammer/anvil, is all Time that allows the metal to cool and less work get done.

    I hope this makes sense.
    Respected but not respectable. ROFLMAO. THATS FUNNY , Mike glad to see you around I knew you could give guidance. Are you going to Howard's? Tc
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcrideshd View Post
    Respected but not respectable. ...
    I learned that one from Howard himself. He might correct the source if there is one. Still, it's pure Howard.

    I thought about going to Howard's as soon as I heard of it. The dayjob will probably not allow it this year. His place is well worth the visit.
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    Senior Member blabbermouth tcrideshd's Avatar
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    Owe will miss you. Tc
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    Senior Member Crawler's Avatar
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    All the advice given seems very sound! I don't have specific guidance for your question, but I can guide you to a source of great blacksmithing knowledge. My current living & financial situation don't allow for my interest in smithing, but that doesn't stop me from reading up on it!

    Forums - I Forge Iron

    Extremely knowledgeable folks over there at IFI, and the community is... eh... almost as friendly & outgoing as the folks here at SRP . Good bunch, they are just a lot more inclined to answer you with "Go use the search function!!!"
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