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Thread: Forging Perceived Value

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    Default Forging Perceived Value

    Does the type of forge used to make a straight razor change the perceived value of the razor? I am gong to use a propane forge, however I had a friend mention that some people would rather have something made in a coal forge.


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    Senior Moderator JimmyHAD's Avatar
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    Interesting question. I'm going to move this to the Workshop sub forum, The Forge. I'm thinking more folks who might have a good answer will see it.
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    Not as far as I am aware. I know some smiths have a personal preference. I know one who swears by coal. Another who uses propane. And I myself use charcoal. Trust me on this one: the type of fire you use matters diddly squat to the perceived value of your razors or how well they will sell. I've never had a customer who asked.
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    A traditional purist may have a preference to charcoal fired over gas.
    But at the end of the day it's about the steal not the heat source.
    Can't see any reason for perceived value difference myself
    Last edited by Substance; 05-15-2016 at 08:54 AM.
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    Intellectually, factually, I know that stock removal is as good a source of blade steel as hand forged, but there is a 'romance' in a hand forged blade that I just don't feel in a blade fashioned by stock removal. In the old days of the custom knife world a Loveless probably brought as much as a Moran, but for me the Moran was the one. Whether coal, charcoal or gas, I never gave that much thought.
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    I've seen people on the Internet that sell knives and emphasize they use a coal forge like it's the best way. I feel marketing wise when people think traditional items like knives and razors they may favor ones that were made "traditionally". I haven't really looked but I have yet to notice anyone that emphasizes they use a propane forge or rather not enough for something to stick in my mind.


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    Quote Originally Posted by thehattr View Post
    I've seen people on the Internet that sell knives and emphasize they use a coal forge like it's the best way. I feel marketing wise when people think traditional items like knives and razors they may favor ones that were made "traditionally". I haven't really looked but I have yet to notice anyone that emphasizes they use a propane forge or rather not enough for something to stick in my mind.


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    Coal is important for knife forging because it allows to adjust the carbon content of steel. Not sure if that matter for razors at all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainaman View Post
    Coal is important for knife forging because it allows to adjust the carbon content of steel. Not sure if that matter for razors a

    There are specific ways in which you can carbonate steel, but forging isn't one of them. No matter what, carbon content goes down during forging. In the time needed to forge a knife, i doubt you could identify what kind of fire was used.
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    There are other factors why forging is preferable to stock removal imo.
    You can make shapes that are outside of the size of the stock you're working with.
    You can forge the shaped almost to finish, so you have to remove a lot less stock. And if the shape is more or less correct, you can follow the surfaces that are already there, instead of having to symmetrically remove a lot of stock from a rectangular bar.
    You can make expensive material last for longer because you waste less. With simple steel this doesn't matter a whole lot, but with wootz or Damascus, it does.

    And of course, it's just good fun.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    the type of fire you use matters diddly squat to the perceived value of your razors or how well they will sell.
    Sorry Bruno, but in this instance you are wrong. Unlike the other two fuels, your charcoal is sustainable, and therefore is a better option! This is an untapped marketing tool available to you!

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