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Thread: 2x72 grinder recommendations

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    Senior Member karlej's Avatar
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    Default 2x72 grinder recommendations

    I'm considering investing in a grinder to regrind razors. I've been looking at Pheer Grinders. Specifically the Variable speed 1 1/2 hp model. Comes with an 8 inch rubber contact wheel and a flat platen. 1.5 x 1.5 inch solid aluminum tool arm. The other is Esteem Grinders variable speed 1 1/2 hp model and come with what looks like an 8 inch rubber contact wheel. 1.25 x 1.25 solid aluminum tool arm. Both look similar to the Bader 111 but at a lot less money.
    Does anyone have any experience with these?
    I do not wish to build one.

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    I do not have any experience with that specific grinder. There are many features that are similar to the Bader-style system and likely the fabricator has modified some of those features to his liking for what he does grinding.

    I have seen/worked with some home built grinders that will beat the Pheer price points by significant amounts. If it was price that was the main criteria. The fellows building their own have some experience with setting up a machine and getting everything square and trued up too. I also know of some home built, or cheap grinders that are always being repaired, or really never ran right from the beginning.

    IMO there is nothing wrong with a Bader. Or KMG, or Coote, or Wilton or Burr King. I've used all of them at one time or another.

    Travis is a fine gentleman and I do recommend his machinery even while I have and use several Baders (III and a couple Space Savers). If I was going to buy another 72 inch, I'd probably get one of his. He has improved on the basic design quite well, he has improved the flexibility of the machine for more-than-one-kind of grinding, his machines are mechanically "tight", and his prices reflect that effort. Wuertz Machine Works | Products

    There are a lot of good-enough grinders out there. A lot of good to great blades have been made on equipment that would raise an eyebrow in any machine shop on the planet. In that case, the operator learned to run what he had well and the machine doesn't make much difference. It's interesting where those guys begin looking when they think about upgrading a tool. I hope you get a lot more responses to this thread and specifically from someone who owns a Pheer (frankly, I'd like to know how they run too). Knowing about all the machines out there, and the kinds of grinders others here are using, really helps before you put good money down.

    If you buy the best you only cry once.

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    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    I have 2 of them, from Uwe Doster in Germany (Der Kleiner Messer Laden).
    Fairly expensive at 1500 euros, but at the time he was the only one making them in this area that I knew of.
    Once you get into grinding from a business pov and you have customers, buying grinders is much more cost effective than making them yourself.

    Variable speed is very important, and then using good, ceramic belts. They're a bit more expensive, but last longer and give a better finish. Esp. at the rough grinding stage.
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    Senior Member karlej's Avatar
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    I think I've settled on the Pheer model 409 2x72 grinder variable speed with a 1 HP motor. It's his new model to replace the 427. Most of the Sheffields I work on are 6/8 to 7/8 near wedge blades to maybe 1/4 hollow. Is the 8 inch contact wheel the right choice? 6" maybe? I'm sure at some point I'll have a number of contact wheels. Just looking for a place to start.
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    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    If I had to pick one it would be 4" or 6". I use Mostly 4". During grinding I rock the blade so that I always have a minimal heat buildup so the wheel can be smaller and still grind a near wedge. 8" Is a bit big imo. Esp for the size you mention.
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    Senior Member karlej's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    If I had to pick one it would be 4" or 6". I use Mostly 4". During grinding I rock the blade so that I always have a minimal heat buildup so the wheel can be smaller and still grind a near wedge. 8" Is a bit big imo. Esp for the size you mention.
    Makes sense. Most of the time I use a 4" buffing wheel and sometimes a 6" for the 7/8 plus blades.
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    Senior Member blabbermouth spazola's Avatar
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    I agree with Bruno, the 4 is the most versatile wheel,

    Charlie
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    Senior Member karlej's Avatar
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    Pulled the trigger on the Pheer grinder. 2x72 variable speed 1 HP and 4" and 6" contact wheels. 3 week lead time. I'm really looking forward to developing the skill set to regrind.
    I have noticed watching what videos I have been able to find on razor regrinding that some grind bevel down and some grind bevel up. Some grind at the bottom of the contact wheel and some at the top of the contact wheel. It would seem to me bevel up near the top of the contact wheel would allow better visibility as you approach the bevel. Thoughts?
    What belt speeds? Do the belt speeds change as I move up in finer grit belts?
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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Nice looking grinder. I am comfortable finishing in the 900 surface feet per minute range regardless of grit. YMMV
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    Edge up or down, it will be because that's how you learned to do it and it feels more comfortable to you. I don't recommend grinding with the belt in reverse (e.g. sparks coming up to meet you).
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