Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 62
Like Tree160Likes

Thread: Re-using Sheffield Steel?

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    cheyenne, wyoming, us
    Posts
    50
    Thanked: 11

    Default

    I think if I needed to make a new razor out of a bunch of old razors, id do a canned sanmai construction. with as thin as the ground portion of the old razors are, I think you would lose that steel almost immediately if you were to try to a forge weld them to scale. then there is not knowing what the old razors were and how to heat treat steel from them.

    so I would make a can, then pack as many old razors as I had in that can, and then fill it with 1084 powder, weld a lid on, and then forge weld the can. then peel the can off, and forge the billet into a bar, and then forge weld that bar onto each side of a piece of known, clean 1095, and then make the razor from that. that way you would have the coolness of the old razor steel, with a known clean edge steel that you know how to heat treat.

    I have not played with smelting steel so couldn't tell you how to do that. closest ive come to playing with that is melting iron and casting it.

    I have played with forge welded cable. and while it is cool to be able to take a piece of junk wire rope and turn it into a knife, I'm not all that fond of it. the pattern to me is sort of plain, and at the end of the day you spent all that time prepping the rope, welding it, forging it out, grinding, heat treating, finishing, ect..... and what you end up with is a chunk of steel that you don't know what it has in it. when you could have started the day with good, clean, known materials and have gotten known repeatable results.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to caltoncutlery For This Useful Post:

    spazola (11-25-2017)

  3. #22
    Senior Member jmabuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    235
    Thanked: 108

    Default

    I think the issue with melting down high carbon steel is that you'll lose the carbon unless you have a way of keeping oxygen away from the steel. It ain't cast iron but you might turn it into that! So the forge-welding ideas are better but even then you have to worry about keeping scale off the steel when you heat it or it won't fuse. And if you put fully hollow-ground razors into a forge that's hot enough for forge-welding I suspect the thin parts will mostly just turn into scale or disappear at high heat; you'll just have the spine and tang. Wedges would be your best bet and you would probably need to worry a little about keeping the mating surfaces nearly flat and unoxidized (like with flux).

    But, what the heck do I know, I never tried it and IANABOAM (I am not a blacksmith or a metallurgist).

  4. #23
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,858
    Thanked: 4070
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    The only sensible way to do it is crucible smelting.
    However that is a fairly tricky and pretty dangerous process. It's not rocket science, but working with molten metal can be extremely dangerous if you go into it without knowledge or experience.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Bruno For This Useful Post:

    cudarunner (11-27-2017)

  6. #24
    Incidere in dimidium Cangooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Bourget, Ontario
    Posts
    3,265
    Thanked: 919

    Default

    I should have clarified - I would be going down the pattern welded billet road, not smelting. I was nervous enough melting down some copper and aluminium in my forge. No way I'm stepping up to molten iron until I have some idea as to what I'd be doing.

    It was in original condition, faded red, well-worn, but nice.
    This was and still is my favorite combination; beautiful, original, and worn.
    -Neil Young

  7. #25
    Senior Member jmabuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    235
    Thanked: 108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cangooner View Post
    I should have clarified - I would be going down the pattern welded billet road, not smelting. I was nervous enough melting down some copper and aluminium in my forge. No way I'm stepping up to molten iron until I have some idea as to what I'd be doing.
    I think that would be a really nice project, kind of a spiritual successor! I can even send you a donor or two if I sort through my stuff.

  8. #26
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    13,858
    Thanked: 4070
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    I don't see it as practical. For pattern welding you need stuff to be flat-ish enough to form a billet that will stay together. Pile a bunch of razors together, hit it at welding temperature, and things will be very exciting around your anvil
    jmabuse likes this.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Bruno For This Useful Post:

    jmabuse (11-27-2017)

  10. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    103
    Thanked: 145

    Default

    Hi,

    before I started making razors I had specialized on making kitchenknives from self alloyed and casted steel. So I have a lot of experience with melting and casting steel. It would be easy (with the corresponding equipement) to melt the old razors, but it wouldnīt be "Sheffield" steel anymore after this process. Because you must add aluminum and glas to the steel which act as protection against oxidation, but at the same time also purify the steel. Further the crucibles have always a high carbon content which will enhance the carbon content of the resulting steel. So if you start with a steel with about 1% Carbon, you will end with about 1,2%.
    The result will be a good carbon steel, but no longer sheffield steel.
    Pattern welding would be tricky too for the reasons Bruno mentioned above.
    Itīs possible, but you would need to forgeweld it many many times in order to get a homogene material (similar to the process used by japanese swordsmiths to refine the tamahagane steel)
    This is a project for someone with much ambition and time or someone with a lot of money to have this made as a custom order.

    best regards,
    Ulrik

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Ulrik For This Useful Post:

    jmabuse (11-27-2017)

  12. #28
    Incidere in dimidium Cangooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Bourget, Ontario
    Posts
    3,265
    Thanked: 919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    I don't see it as practical. For pattern welding you need stuff to be flat-ish enough to form a billet that will stay together. Pile a bunch of razors together, hit it at welding temperature, and things will be very exciting around your anvil
    Ah, but not if they're squared off first.

    It was in original condition, faded red, well-worn, but nice.
    This was and still is my favorite combination; beautiful, original, and worn.
    -Neil Young

  13. #29
    Senior Member jmabuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    235
    Thanked: 108

    Default

    The makers of "Forged in Fire" (http://www.history.com/shows/forged-in-fire) should do a razor episode. But no, it's always weapons, weapons, weapons. Boring!
    Steel, bluesman7 and Slawman like this.

  14. #30
    Incidere in dimidium Cangooner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Bourget, Ontario
    Posts
    3,265
    Thanked: 919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jmabuse View Post
    The makers of "Forged in Fire" (Forged in Fire Full Episodes, Video & More | HISTORY) should do a razor episode. But no, it's always weapons, weapons, weapons. Boring!
    I wish they would branch out into other aspects of smithing beyond bladesmithing. But I imagine that's where the ratings are.

    It was in original condition, faded red, well-worn, but nice.
    This was and still is my favorite combination; beautiful, original, and worn.
    -Neil Young

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •