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Thread: knife maker making a razor

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    Senior Member cosperryan's Avatar
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    Default knife maker making a razor

    So what would be some tips for someone, who makes knives and has no experience making a razor, who wants to make a straight razor. I would probably first start out just doing stock removal for the first one or two and then go to forging. Its so much smaller than what I normally forge that I dont want to start out trying forging from the get go. For grinding I use a 8" bench grinder when I grind knives. Mainly whats the geometry requirements. Im not to good at doing maths and honestly dont remember my formulas from high school to figure out the geometry. I was thinking of using 3/16ths stock but I do have 1/4" also available. Using 01 for the steel. Thinking something like a french point and would like to have some smile to it.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth spazola's Avatar
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    The geometry is about 16ish degrees, or 3.5 or 4 in blade width to 1 in spine thickness.

    Charlie

    https://youtu.be/isPvvVdyQio
    Last edited by spazola; 08-29-2016 at 03:10 AM.

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    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    If your razor is 7/8 to 8/8 use the 1/4 thick stock
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    Senior Member AKmik's Avatar
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    There are a ton of great links here to Youtube vids. I joined this board recently because I found myself here researching so much I figured what the heck. I am also a knife maker , and have developed an obsession with razors lately.

    If you have a shop full of gear and can properly HT 01 its all about the design/layout and the grinds. As far as the small size and grinding goes, its a refreshing change no more difficult than any other hollow grinding just have to watch the heat a little closer because of the thin edge.

    I am mid stroke on my first batch of six and so far so good, went with 1/4" x1" O1, and grinding on an 8" wheel, thread is below somewhere. I will get back to them later this week. Right now Im finishing a batch of kitchen knives which will finance two more tooling arms and smaller contact wheels for the KMG. Bit by the bug I was.

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    Senior Member cosperryan's Avatar
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    Awesome thanks guys. Oh yeah if using o1 would I still be going for a bout the same heat treat as I would knives or do I want a harder blade for a razor. My knives are typically around 56-58 HRc.

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    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    For razors you will want to aim a little higher. 59 to 61 is generally thought to be the sweet spot

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    Straight outta Bawlmer Boots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    For razors you will want to aim a little higher. 59 to 61 is generally thought to be the sweet spot
    out of curiosity, since yo don't need any impact resistance, you could in theory just quench with no temper and get a super hard blade, especially if you are using 1095 or other high carbon. I've been shaving with a straight for years but just a beginner in the honing arena, so I don't know if it will effect that other than taking a bit longer to set the bevel, but will a super hard but brittle razor have any drawbacks?
    Last edited by Boots; 09-12-2016 at 03:49 PM.
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    Senior Member blabbermouth spazola's Avatar
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    In my experience I get a smoother/more comfortable edge on a tempered blade.

    I am not exactly sure why, but I would surmise that the tempered blade edge is a little more resistant to crumbling at the very edge and takes and keeps a better edge.

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    Senior Member AKmik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boots View Post
    out of curiosity, since yo don't need any impact resistance, you could in theory just quench with no temper and get a super hard blade, especially if you are using 1095 or other high carbon. I've been shaving with a straight for years but just a beginner in the honing arena, so I don't know if it will effect that other than taking a bit longer to set the bevel, but will a super hard but brittle razor have any drawbacks?
    Negative, any blade must be tempered to some degree after the quench. A 1095 blade can crack just sitting on the bench if you dilly dally between the quench and temper. You can adjust the HRc (RC) by adjusting the temper temperature.
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    Senior Member AKmik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spazola View Post
    In my experience I get a smoother/more comfortable edge on a tempered blade.

    I am not exactly sure why, but I would surmise that the tempered blade edge is a little more resistant to crumbling at the very edge and takes and keeps a better edge.

    They are all tempered, weather a manufacturer uses that as a marketing gimmick or not.

    Something very common in the SR world is confusion, or misinformation about tempering/HT of steels. I have watched several videos now being narrated by someone in the SR community at a makers shop describing the HT process and he was way off in his interpretation of what goes on. Not a big deal as far as consumers go , but if you were researching processes (me) that is bad info.


    EDIT
    ***** the saying "don't tell fish stories to the fish" comes to my mind here. Hahaa don't think I need to explain HT to you.
    Im leaving my answer up for you to educate me here if I am wrong. Just saw your avatar after I replied and thought it looked familiar from the videos.
    Last edited by AKmik; 09-12-2016 at 08:41 PM.

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