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Thread: Any Classes or Workshops available?

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    Default Any Classes or Workshops available?

    Hi, I've been trying to make a decent straight razor. I am curious if any of you know people who do workshops for it. I am not interested in forging, as I have a grinder set up. I live in the Durango area, but would be willing to travel. Eager to learn. Learning a lot on my own but just think I could really benefit from meeting with someone that has experience doing it. I've burned through a lot of steel and belts, and would like to expedite my learning curve, if possible. Thanks.

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    'with that said' cudarunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bronzie View Post
    Hi, I've been trying to make a decent straight razor. I am curious if any of you know people who do workshops for it. I am not interested in forging, as I have a grinder set up. I live in the Durango area, but would be willing to travel. Eager to learn. Learning a lot on my own but just think I could really benefit from meeting with someone that has experience doing it. I've burned through a lot of steel and belts, and would like to expedite my learning curve, if possible. Thanks.
    Hello from SE Washington State:

    First and foremost it would be a Friendly Gesture if you could expand on your profile so that people can know where you are. If you are fairly close to someone then they may offer to help.

    I am 'Presuming' that when you say that you live in the Durango area you mean in Colorado.

    Unless you are in the Witness Protection Program or someone is hunting you; it would be very useful if you could provide more info.

    I will again presume that you are in Colorado and let a member who may be able to help you know of this thread.

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    Last edited by cudarunner; 04-30-2017 at 12:47 AM.
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    Not exactly what you asked for but there is this. The man that operates this is very well know in the knife and razor world.
    Classes at Morgan Valley Forge. | Omimi
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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    I've been to a few razor makers meets and one of the things that we have found is that everyone does it a bit different.

    What are the specific problems that you are having?

    EDIT; I looked up your previous thread where you described your past problem with grinding too far. Did you try again with a larger wheel diameter since then? Even though that razor was a fail, it looks like you are very close to success.
    Last edited by bluesman7; 04-30-2017 at 03:52 PM.
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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RezDog View Post
    Not exactly what you asked for but there is this. The man that operates this is very well know in the knife and razor world.
    Classes at Morgan Valley Forge. | Omimi
    Yes, Howard has also done some classes specific to razors.
    See my razors at bluesmanblades.com

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    Senior Member xiaotuzi's Avatar
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    When I was first starting out I contacted a local barber school and they were happy to let me "sit in" on a day when they were covering straight razors. I brought a razor and a hone with me and got a lot of good information as well as hands on experience.

    Then, when the classes were finished for the day, I sat for a shave and a haircut from one of the students who was about to graduate. He shaved me a little with my razor to show me what was wrong with my edge, then did the rest with a shavette so I could feel a shave-ready edge. After that we practiced a little honing.

    It was great! They were happy to have me there and I really learned a lot.
    "Go easy"

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesman7 View Post
    I've been to a few razor makers meets and one of the things that we have found is that everyone does it a bit different.

    What are the specific problems that you are having?

    EDIT; I looked up your previous thread where you described your past problem with grinding too far. Did you try again with a larger wheel diameter since then? Even though that razor was a fail, it looks like you are very close to success.
    I did try again with a 5 inch wheel. It went a lot better but not what I was looking for. Specifically, I'm curious how other people have their rest and attachment arm set up, and the reasoning behind it. Are people using a jig? I'm having trouble with the maintaining the "line" near the spine after heat treating. Also, what thickness are people shooting for before they set a bevel? This time around I ended up going too thin on the back and sort of chipped the edge while I was attempting to even the thickness. I think I'm close. Another problem I have is that when I try to narrow the tang, I'm really just guessing and inconsistent. Is there are proper ratio for that? Post HT I use 120 grit paper, and keep the grinder at between 30-40% on a KMG variable speed.

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    xiao--That's a great idea. Ill definitely try it when I more of a finished product.
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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bronzie View Post
    I did try again with a 5 inch wheel. It went a lot better but not what I was looking for. Specifically, I'm curious how other people have their rest and attachment arm set up, and the reasoning behind it. Are people using a jig? I'm having trouble with the maintaining the "line" near the spine after heat treating. Also, what thickness are people shooting for before they set a bevel? This time around I ended up going too thin on the back and sort of chipped the edge while I was attempting to even the thickness. I think I'm close. Another problem I have is that when I try to narrow the tang, I'm really just guessing and inconsistent. Is there are proper ratio for that? Post HT I use 120 grit paper, and keep the grinder at between 30-40% on a KMG variable speed.
    I do my rough grinding with a jig, but all of my post heat treat grinding free hand. When I'm free handing I don't use a rest at all other than sometimes touching the sides of my elbows to a 10-12" inch wide board that I have clamped to the table under the wheel. It is mostly there in case I accidentally drop the razor. I do the vast majority of my post heat treat work down to about .006" with 60 grit. By the time it is cleaned up with finer grits my edge is around .004" . I find the tang tapers a bit tricky also. I try to do all of the tang work very early before rough grinding the hollows and while there are lots of flat surfaces to go by. My tapers end up in the 8/1 range.

    Some people leave the edge thicker, set the bevel, and then use the bevel reveal to guide the last bit of their grinding. Others take the edge to zero before setting the bevel.

    This is why classes are of limited value. I can tell someone all the methods that I've seen, but I can only show them my way. There is a good chance that my way will not end up being their way.
    Last edited by bluesman7; 05-02-2017 at 04:42 AM.
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    I don't use a jig for anything, and I start with forged blanks. Everything is eyeballing including the spine lines etc. In the beginning I experimented with carving center lines and such, but when you work with forged blanks that is not an option anyway. Most of the problems that people have are simply lack of practice. Jig or not, you'll have to practice in order to get the necessary consistency.
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