Results 1 to 8 of 8
Like Tree32Likes
  • 13 Post By bluesman7
  • 1 Post By evnpar
  • 5 Post By Gasman
  • 1 Post By caltoncutlery
  • 5 Post By bluesman7
  • 1 Post By spazola
  • 1 Post By caltoncutlery
  • 5 Post By bluesman7

Thread: Brick stack forge

  1. #1
    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Denver CO
    Posts
    1,342
    Thanked: 346

    Default Brick stack forge

    I've been using a brick stack forge for over 4 years. It has evolved a bit over the years which is a big advantage to this design. For general forging and billet welding I have a 2.5" x 3" x 9" working volume.
    Name:  DSCN1717.jpg
Views: 104
Size:  53.2 KB
    Name:  DSCN1719.jpg
Views: 100
Size:  59.2 KB

    And for heat treating I expand the volume about 6x and add the pipe muffle.
    Name:  DSCN1823.jpg
Views: 102
Size:  45.3 KB

    A piece of charcoal in the pipe produces a CO atmosphere eliminating scaling and the large volume makes holding an even controllable heat much easier.
    See my razors at bluesmanblades.com

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to bluesman7 For This Useful Post:

    Dieseld (12-08-2017), Hirlau (12-08-2017), markbignosekelly (12-08-2017), spazola (Yesterday)

  3. #2
    Senior Member evnpar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,935
    Thanked: 315

    Default

    Thanks for sharing this information. You sure produce some terrific blades with this setup.
    bluesman7 likes this.
    Richard

  4. #3
    Senior Member blabbermouth Gasman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Colorado springs
    Posts
    2,343
    Thanked: 497

    Default

    I've seen Vics setup in his shop. I had no idea of what I was looking at besides a pile of stacked bricks. Then he fired it up and there was some serious flame going on! I just know like evnpar that Vic puts out some really nice blades. Oh, and the belt sander was really cool too Vic. Puts my Harbor Freight belt sander to shame! And when he showed me how he just braces his arm up to hold the blade for sanding, I was blown away!

    Your an artist Vic!
    Jerry...

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    cheyenne, wyoming, us
    Posts
    49
    Thanked: 10

    Default

    oh my, that is gorgeous! simple, cost efficient, elegant, versitle!!

    those look like hard firebricks also? and regular fireplace cement from menards? and a homebrew atmospheric burner?

    I bet you could set up the bricks in a circular tower type fashion and use it for casting aluminum and copper pretty easy also.

    I love it!

    I was just on the phone early this morning to a young fella that comes by the shop once in awhile to make knives, and he wanted to get some refractory blanket and satinite from me to build a forge. huge thing from what he described, like 14" diameter and 54" long {dang near as big as my sword forge}, and all for $50!! next time he comes over I'm going to show him this one.
    Geezer likes this.

  6. #5
    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Denver CO
    Posts
    1,342
    Thanked: 346

    Default

    It's all soft brick. The floor was constructed of all broken soft brick pieces that I had collected over the years. As a welder I had occasional use for fire bricks and small pieces of same. The floor has been patched from flux damage with Satanite and crushed soft brick. The soft bricks do deteriorate from thermal cycling, but I just glue them back together with Satanite. The three bricks at the burner are mortared down onto the floor so that the burner nozzle is mortared in place, then I just dry stack what ever I need from there.

    Hard bricks are too much of a heat sink to use.
    See my razors at bluesmanblades.com

  7. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to bluesman7 For This Useful Post:

    32t (12-09-2017), caltoncutlery (Yesterday), Dieseld (12-09-2017), Geezer (12-09-2017), ScottGoodman (Yesterday), spazola (Yesterday)

  8. #6
    Senior Member blabbermouth spazola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Burkburnett TX
    Posts
    2,376
    Thanked: 1927

    Default

    I like the way you get things done. That forge rocks, or it is rocks very cool.

    It makes me feel like an idget for making another forge this week.
    Geezer likes this.

  9. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    cheyenne, wyoming, us
    Posts
    49
    Thanked: 10

    Default

    spazola, there is nothing wrong with having more forges! I have 4 forges plus a propane/waste oil furnace for casting in the shop, and a coal forge in storage, and am trying to convince myself that I don't have the room or the need for one like bluesmans.

    bluesmans, gotcha, the color that I see in those pics look just like some hard bricks I have.

    when patching those soft bricks with satinite, how well does the repair hold? the couple one brick forges that I made for a friend, we wired the outside of the brick to keep them together after awhile.
    spazola likes this.

  10. #8
    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Denver CO
    Posts
    1,342
    Thanked: 346

    Default

    The repair seems almost as strong as the brick. In other words the next time the brick fails it is not always at the joint. I think that the Satanite gets stronger after it is fired. For thicker repairs the Satanite with crushed brick seems best. Repairs done in the evening can be put in service the next morning.
    See my razors at bluesmanblades.com

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •