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Thread: forge ideas

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    Senior Member blabbermouth spazola's Avatar
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    Default forge ideas

    All of this talk of steels and grinders has been fueling my desire to make a razor. I have been toying with the idea for quite awhile. I think I will order some 1095 and try a stock removal type blade. My problem is, what to use for a heat source to harden the blade. I was thinking of the one brick forge that is in W. Goddard’s book or some variation of a bean can forge. I do not want the best, but I would like something that will last for a few blades. I am looking for ideas.

    If I get the razor making AD in the future I can upgrade. Right now I am just looking for an inexpensive way to make do.

    Thanks

    Charlie

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    Senior Member blabbermouth ChrisL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spazola View Post
    All of this talk of steels and grinders has been fueling my desire to make a razor. I have been toying with the idea for quite awhile. I think I will order some 1095 and try a stock removal type blade. My problem is, what to use for a heat source to harden the blade. I was thinking of the one brick forge that is in W. Goddard’s book or some variation of a bean can forge. I do not want the best, but I would like something that will last for a few blades. I am looking for ideas.

    If I get the razor making AD in the future I can upgrade. Right now I am just looking for an inexpensive way to make do.

    Thanks

    Charlie
    Good luck, Charlie. The $50 Knife Shop is a great book. I picked myself up a copy just recently. Think of how many thousands of hobby knife makers there are in the U.S. alone. Razor making may just be the next outgrowth of that. I too have my "wheels turning". I live in an area of the U.S. that's known for quarrying granite. In that same book you mention, Goddard talks about a granite anvil rather than a steel anvil and said he really liked using one (no noise, solid as, well, a rock). I'd buy a granite hunk for sure to use as a forge if I get bitten by the bug.

    I'm sure a few of the few that are making customs will chime in.

    Chris L
    "Blues fallin' down like hail." Robert Johnson
    "Aw, Pretty Boy, can't you show me nuthin but surrender?" Patti Smith

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    I like the idea of using a granite stone for knife making, probably because of my close proximity to Granite Falls, MN.
    See if you can find some fire brick for making a kiln, a forge is not going to melt them, and they are relativly cheap.

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    Razorsmith JoshEarl's Avatar
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    The one-brick forge really works. Believe it or not, that's what I've been forging my blades in so far. I have a real propane forge on order that should be arriving next week. Yippee!

    A one-brick forge will allow you to get small pieces of steel up to temperature for heat treating, forging and even forge-welding. I have done all three. Definitely spend the $30 for the Bernzomatic JTH7 torch. The smaller ones are a waste of money for this application.

    You can get firebricks for the forge from Ellis Custom Knifeworks - Custom Knives, Straight Razors, Display Cases, and Refractory Supplies. Darren is the guy who's making my forge for me.

    This tutorial shows how to make a two-brick forge that is MUCH better than the one-brick variety: Son of Two Brick Forge - British Blades :: Custom Knife Making

    If you're primarily using the forge for heat-treating, make a bigger two-brick forge and put a piece of 2" iron pipe inside to even out the heat. One of the main problems with these forges is that they have an intense hot spot, which makes getting an even heat on a blade difficult.

    Have fun!

    Josh
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    Shaves like a pirate jockeys's Avatar
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    the time I tried my hand at this sort of thing (I was making knives), I used a tortilla cooker about 3 feet high and a shop vacuum for the forced induction. doesn't work at all with charcoal, you need real coal, but if you can get that, it works great and costs next to nothing.

    neighborhood association wasn't real happy with me, but what are you gonna do?

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    Senior Member blabbermouth spazola's Avatar
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    Josh,
    Thanks for the links and the ideas. I was wondering what a good source for soft fire bricks would be. The two brick forge is high on my list now.

    Jockeys,
    I thought that I was a master scrounger, I now see I have much to learn.
    Forging in a tortilla maker, I bow to your scroungability.

    Charlie

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    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    That firebrick, isn't that the same as the standard Iton building blocks used in construction?
    You should be able to get those in any DIY shop which has building materials.

    EDIT: I forgot that in the US, building in bricks is done less than over here, so maybe you have to find a shop where they specialize in building materials
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

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    I have seen some setups that are relatively cheap, some ideas are shown on youtube.

    this one is part one of four, shows what can be done with very little investment.
    Cinderblocks are not going to work instead of firebrick. sometimes they explode when heated due to trapped moisture in them. even ebay has some firebrick if you can't locate some near you.

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    Razorsmith JoshEarl's Avatar
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    There are two types of firebrick--hard and soft. The hard stuff isn't good for forge building, as it dissipates heat rather than retaining it.

    The soft firebricks are almost like styrofoam; you can carve them with a spoon or dull knife. These retain and concentrate heat. I can touch the outside of my two-brick forge with my bare hand. I might get burned a little, but an inch away, the heat is over 2000 degrees F.

    The soft bricks are sometimes available locally. Look under refractory supplies in the phone book. They are used for lining furnaces and kilns.

    Josh

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoshEarl View Post
    If you're primarily using the forge for heat-treating, make a bigger two-brick forge and put a piece of 2" iron pipe inside to even out the heat. One of the main problems with these forges is that they have an intense hot spot, which makes getting an even heat on a blade difficult.
    How does the iron pipe fit in? I envision cutting a section of pipe to the same length as the chamber and drilling a hole in it for the burner in the same place as it is in the brick ? The article you posted suggested using ITC-100 to line the chamber is the pipe a cheaper alternative ?

    Barney

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