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Thread: Safety Gear!

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    The Razor Whisperer Philadelph's Avatar
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    Default Safety Gear!

    Just wondering what everyone uses in this department as I think it is a pretty important one. Off the top of my head, safety glasses, respirator, and leather apron come to mind. Anything in particular you look for with each of these? I've seen a bunch of half-mask respirators which is probably what I'd get, but have no idea which. Right now I use pretty cheap/improvised stuff and want to get serious in this department.

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    Senior Member mastermute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philadelph View Post
    I've seen a bunch of half-mask respirators which is probably what I'd get, but have no idea which.
    I got me a half mask respirator after blowing my nose after a session at the belt sander! It was black! I also use it when I do CA coating, that stuff burns after a couple of coatings in one night!

    I always wear protecive goggles when [belt]sanding, cutting and grinding!

    I'd love a leather apron, and butchers mesh gloves... those are on my wish list!

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    Senior Member floppyshoes's Avatar
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    I have just about as many safety devices as tools:


    • JSP PowerCap visor/respirator (best xmas gift ever)
    • Leather apron
    • Mechanic's gloves, Filetting gloves (steel wire mesh), Leather gauntlets, latex gloves
    • Steel cap boots
    • Levi's 501 jeans (anyone who works in a shop can attest a good, thick pair of jeans counts as safety gear
    • Smoke detector, CO detector, Type ABC fire extinguisher, ground fault breaker outlets (I'm near the plumbing in the basement)
    • Pedal switches for most of my larger tools (router, table saw, buffer, drill press)
    • 1/3 hp exhaust fan in window
    • 6 enclosed T8 fluorescent fixtures w/ electronic ballast (good lighting is an important but often overlooked safety precaution)
    • Beeper on the door (so nobody can come in without you knowing. "sneak-ups" are high on the list of things that can cause serious accidents)

    I also have countless jigs and templates that reduce the risk of injury and tons of other stuff I can't remember right now.

    Awesome thread and an excellent subject.
    Last edited by floppyshoes; 06-09-2008 at 07:25 PM.

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    Senior Member rastewart's Avatar
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    Just as a frivolous aside, I read about three sentences into the first post thinking in terms of safety gear for shaving with a straight ... Just put it down to not getting that second cup of coffee this morning.

    ~Rich ... back to our regularly scheduled thread ...

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    The Razor Whisperer Philadelph's Avatar
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    How do you choose a particular respirator and apron? Anything that is a must?

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    JAS eTea, LLC netsurfr's Avatar
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    rastewart, don't feel like the lone ranger! I was seeing how the leather apron could be good safety equipment for shaving but was having a hard time tying the safety glasses and respirator into the shaving experience. That's when the lightbulb came on....

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    The Razor Whisperer Philadelph's Avatar
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    Just a reminder here fellas! This is the FORGE section lol. I think that means it's where guys talk about making razors and related stuff. Just my guess though...

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    Senior Member Kenrup's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philadelph View Post
    Just a reminder here fellas! This is the FORGE section lol. I think that means it's where guys talk about making razors and related stuff. Just my guess though...
    A big honking FIRE EXTINGUISHER!

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    Senior Member blabbermouth ChrisL's Avatar
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    I need to get more safety gear. I do have cut resistant kevlar mesh gloves that have saved me from I don't know how many cuts and probably even some stitches when using the buffer; as Bill Ellis and others have said, the buffer IMO is one of the if not THE most dangerous machine in the shop. I want to upgrade and get the kevlar gloves that extend to the elbow to prevent any artery cutting.

    Chris L
    "Blues fallin' down like hail." Robert Johnson
    "Aw, Pretty Boy, can't you show me nuthin but surrender?" Patti Smith

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    Senior Member floppyshoes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philadelph View Post
    How do you choose a particular respirator and apron? Anything that is a must?
    The apron is sized. You want it to cover as much as possible while still fitting closely and not being too heavy. Mine has leather in the front and canvas elsewhere (helps it breath a little)

    The respirator is something you want to try on before buying if you can. Make sure it's adjustable and that you have good range of motion. When you look down, as if at the edge of a table while standing, the visor should contact your collar bone (or the top of your apron should you have one). A fabric head band is a must. The cheap ones have plastic and it tends to slip off if you sweat even a little. Also, make sure you can put in the kinds of filters you'll be needing. Some respirators have weak motors and won't handle a fine filter well. Lastly, make sure the power supply is comfortable and lasts a decent amount of time. It's a real pain when your respirator dies before you're done doing whatever it is you need it for.

    I forgot to mention. I have a half dozen or so welding caps lying around. Thay are great for keeping crap out of your hair (sparks, sawdust, metal filings, errant doritos...)

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