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Thread: The usual hone questions from a rookie honer

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    Smile The usual hone questions from a rookie honer

    My dad is an avid wood worker and uses chisels and planes all the time. He used to use traditional whetstones to sharpen up his chisels and the like but recently switched over to some machine to sharpen them now. He had no need for his old whetstones so gave them to me to sharpen my razors with! Pretty sweet gift I know

    Anyways, the stones he gave me are a Samurai? 800/4000 combo (i think that's what it is at least) and a norton 8K. The stones are in good shape but he said he's never lapped them so I know I need to get a lapping plate to clean them up and then eventually a finisher so here's my questions:

    Would the consensus be that the DMT 8" 325 would be my best bet for a lapping plate? Are there any others out there you all would recommend?

    And as for finishers, would you guys say natural or synthetic? I'm leaning towards a thuringian or the Naniwa 12k or maybe even a coticule haha so many options! Your thoughts? Also going to get some CrOx paste for my strop and the one question I have is do you put it on the back or the leather or back of the fabric?

    I know thats a lot of questions and most have probably been asked before but I really appreciate any feedback I can get from you guys cuz you're all the best!

    Sam

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    Senior Member Vasilis's Avatar
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    Your father has a nice progression of stones, although I don't know this samurai brand, they re pretty much exactly what you need.
    For lapping, some sandpaper onn a flat surface will do the trick, some sheets of 200 and a couple of 500 grit for a smoother surface of the fine stones. If you have 20 or more razors, a diamond plate would be useful, but for a smaller number, sandpaper works just fine.
    For finisher, your norton and CrOx is all you need. No need for Thuringians and 12k naniwas if you use some CrOx. The finer stones are if you want an edge that can shave nicely without any stropping on pastes. Where you use it is your choice; for me, I usually prefer the back side of my strops.
    You can buy better and finer stones, but, experience is worth more than the price of the stones. Learn with what you have, and, you can buy better stones after you know what the ones you have can do.
    Last edited by Vasilis; 02-09-2014 at 07:42 PM.
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    Contains ingredients Tack's Avatar
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    The 325 DMT is probably the most often used plate for lapping although it would not be the best choice for lapping a stone that is badly dished. You might want the extra coarse (220) in that case.

    The consensus seems to be that a new honer is better off learning on synthetics simply because they are more consistent and therefore predictable. I'd suggest the 12K Nani instead of the thuri to start with. Just remember that the real work, the "sharp", has to be there before moving on to your 8 or 12K finisher.

    Most people will crox the fabric rather than the leather but that is a personal choice. Lynn has a nice video that gives the basics:





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    Vasilis - I can't find anything on the samurai stones either I'll post a pic when I get home see if anyone else knows anything about them. when using the sandpaper would it be better to soak the stones and use the sandpaper wet or keep the stones dry and use the sand paper dry? And as of right now I'm not planning on getting a finisher for a while until I am more than skilled enough on the stones I have. I just plan on using the CrOx after honing to smooth it out a little.

    Thanks for the video link tack! I've watched so many of those I feel like now and feel I have a good grasp on what to do when I start. Fingers crossed cuz one of my razors is starting to pull really bad now that it hurts a little haha

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    Senior Member Vasilis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chapman View Post
    Vasilis - I can't find anything on the samurai stones either I'll post a pic when I get home see if anyone else knows anything about them. when using the sandpaper would it be better to soak the stones and use the sandpaper wet or keep the stones dry and use the sand paper dry? And as of right now I'm not planning on getting a finisher for a while until I am more than skilled enough on the stones I have. I just plan on using the CrOx after honing to smooth it out a little.

    Thanks for the video link tack! I've watched so many of those I feel like now and feel I have a good grasp on what to do when I start. Fingers crossed cuz one of my razors is starting to pull really bad now that it hurts a little haha
    There is not a big difference if you use the sandpaper with the stones soaked wet or dry. I usually prefer the stones to be dry, because there are some naturals that can't get flat when wet. And it became a habit, plus it's less messy. Make sure to wash and rub them with your hand, to remove any loose particles, after.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vasilis View Post
    There is not a big difference if you use the sandpaper with the stones soaked wet or dry. I usually prefer the stones to be dry, because there are some naturals that can't get flat when wet. And it became a habit, plus it's less messy. Make sure to wash and rub them with your hand, to remove any loose particles, after.
    How so you ensure the lapping ends up being level? Do you just put the sandpaper on the table and scrub away or do you mark the top of the stone with a pencil?

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    Senior Member Vasilis's Avatar
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    An easy way to see if the stone is flat, is, place a ruler or something else flat on the stone, and, if light or water passes between the stone and the ruler, the stone needs lapping.
    Yes, make some lines on the stone with the pencil, and lap the stone until the lines disappear. It helps a lot.

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    Chasing the Edge WadePatton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chapman View Post
    How so you ensure the lapping ends up being level? Do you just put the sandpaper on the table and scrub away or do you mark the top of the stone with a pencil?
    As you state initially, every question you have - has been asked and discussed here, sometimes more than once even.

    Welcome and feel free to look around and read up. Congrats on the stones, they might be quite wonky with him never leveling them. Grid and remove. I do more than one grid on new or "over worked" stones.

    You'll want as flat a surface as possible to mount your sandpaper. Glass or granite is very good, less perfect things can work. Grind two bricks together and you'll get a flat surface where they meet, eventually.

    Here is how you lap a stone with a leveling tool such as DMT or other lapping plate:
    Last edited by WadePatton; 02-09-2014 at 10:33 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WadePatton View Post

    You'll want as flat a surface as possible to mount your sandpaper. Glass or granite is very good, less perfect things can work. Grind two bricks together and you'll get a flat surface where they meet, eventually.
    Thanks for the response! I've been doing my best to search and find all my answers there's just so many different places to find information it's pretty great but a little overwhelming I have a good chunk of granite to do the lapping on so that's good to know!What would be the best way to stick the sandpaper on the granite so it doesn't move?

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    Chasing the Edge WadePatton's Avatar
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    You'll want wet/dry sandpaper, and it will stick fairly well just being wet. Sometimes the answers "pop up" when you start doing these things.

    Yes information overloadus maximus is the standard thing these days. That's why you'll find very specific "wiki" or other such reference areas at many forums. If you haven't seen it, ours is: Straight Razor Place Library - Straight Razor Place Library


    I recall back when the information highway was a dirt road.

    Quote Originally Posted by chapman View Post
    Thanks for the response! I've been doing my best to search and find all my answers there's just so many different places to find information it's pretty great but a little overwhelming I have a good chunk of granite to do the lapping on so that's good to know!What would be the best way to stick the sandpaper on the granite so it doesn't move?
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