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Thread: First jNat - how to prep?

  1. #11
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    If the vendor is reliable and has honed razors on it, it's most likely flat. Sight down the stone face at an angle at a light source and see if the reflection distorts as it moves across the surface. If it does not, it's dead flat.

    You don't really need to seal the sides unless there are layer cracks in it but you can if you want. I use regular Zinsser brushing lacquer - regular lacquer can be removed with an overnight soak in alcohol if you want.

    Pictures when you get it would be good!

    Cheers, Steve

  2. #12
    Maruka Shaman of West London JOB15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve56 View Post
    If the vendor is reliable and has honed razors on it, it's most likely flat. Sight down the stone face at an angle at a light source and see if the reflection distorts as it moves across the surface. If it does not, it's dead flat.

    You don't really need to seal the sides unless there are layer cracks in it but you can if you want. I use regular Zinsser brushing lacquer - regular lacquer can be removed with an overnight soak in alcohol if you want.

    Pictures when you get it would be good!

    Cheers, Steve
    If the stone has been honed on then it would not be flat..

    Maruka Kingpin of England

  3. #13
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    Not true IME except maybe in the abstract sense. Most of the wear on jnats come from raising the slurry, not honing the razor. If you're careful about using even pressure over the entire hone face when raising a slurry, the stone will stay flat. Several Japanese vendors mention using a nagura this way.

    I have jnats that I use regularly and haven't lapped for months if not more than a year. they're as flat as when I did lap them.

    This is a fairly significant thing if you have valuable stones, especially valuable thin ones. If you just use the nagura in the center portion of the stone the stone becomes dished and you have to lap it. If you use the nagura properly, the stone does not dish, and you can spend a little more time raising slurry on the corners if you want, but believe me the nagura wears the stone far more than the razor does.

    Think about it, you're rubbing an abrasive stone on the hone with much greater pressure (usually) than a non abrasive razor.

    Cheers, Steve
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  4. #14
    Maruka Shaman of West London JOB15's Avatar
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    I hear you.
    However I raise slurries around the sides always and still find dishing to occur.

    I guess it comes down to , how flat do you want your stones.

    Maybe it is dished ever so slightly but that still means that some parts of the blade are receiving more pressure than others..
    In my experience, the flatter the stone the better the results..
    Thanks .
    Joe
    Maruka Kingpin of England

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOB15 View Post
    I hear you.
    However I raise slurries around the sides always and still find dishing to occur.

    I guess it comes down to , how flat do you want your stones.

    Maybe it is dished ever so slightly but that still means that some parts of the blade are receiving more pressure than others..
    In my experience, the flatter the stone the better the results..
    Thanks .
    Joe
    Ha! I did that too Joe. I tried just using the edges and corners, and the stone became high in the center!

    My stones aren't dished. The reflection is perfectly undistorted as it travels across the hone face. Like a mirror. If the reflection does not distort, the stone is perfectly flat.

    Cheers, Steve

  6. #16
    Maruka Shaman of West London JOB15's Avatar
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    Ok, you win.
    I'm sure if I had your stones , a pencil and my Shapton plate, I could prove you wrong..

    Still, a new stone, lapping would be my first port of call..
    Thanks..
    Maruka Kingpin of England

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    Thanks for the advice. I asked the vendor about this and he told me he lacquered the sides personally. He also lapped one side. He did not lap or seal the bottom of the hone as it is free of cracks,inclusions or damage and it could if i felt like it lap the bottom and use it to hone on. When it arrives i will post a pic. But it looks good so far.

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    This Ozuki Asagi is to arrive tomorrow. My probably silly question is, that the identifying stamp on the front of the stone. Is it important to avoid if possible removing it when using or lapping? Should a simple photo be taken of it, for the purpose of perhaps future re-sale? Ivee read where some like to preserve the stamp. Is that at all necessary? Of course I dont anticipate seelling at any time, but purely on the basis of the fact that to a lay-man they all look similarly, so that stamp has significance. i'm inclined to forget it, but Id be interested to hear others view on this.
    thanks Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobski View Post
    This Ozuki Asagi is to arrive tomorrow. My probably silly question is, that the identifying stamp on the front of the stone. Is it important to avoid if possible removing it when using or lapping? Should a simple photo be taken of it, for the purpose of perhaps future re-sale? Ivee read where some like to preserve the stamp. Is that at all necessary? Of course I dont anticipate seelling at any time, but purely on the basis of the fact that to a lay-man they all look similarly, so that stamp has significance. i'm inclined to forget it, but Id be interested to hear others view on this.
    thanks Bob
    Take pictures. I also take a screenshot of the listing when buying from online vendors.
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