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Thread: Naniwa Economical Series

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    Senior Member Brontosaurus's Avatar
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    Default Naniwa Economical Series

    I'm curious about the Naniwa economical series, as they are smaller and I like to hand-hold the stones, rather than use them on a bench. Also because I like the Suehiro 1k/3k combo stone prior to moving to natural stones.

    The Naniwa economical line comes in 120, 1000, and 3000. Any thoughts on the viability of using the 120 stone as a lapping stone for the 1000 and 3000? I'm supposing I could keep the 120 refreshed by lapping it on 80x wet/dry sandpaper on glass and that the stone would be smoothed by the 1000 prior to moving to lap the 3000.
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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Lynn has good things to say about the economical series 1k. Why not use the 1k to lap the 3k, or the wet/dry to lap the both of them. My impression is that the stones are pretty soft and the fineness of the lapped surface will be immaterial.
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    Junior Tinkerer Srdjan's Avatar
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    I think they would stick to one another due to suction and you may just get annoyed in a very short time. In my experience, the best, most economical tools for any lapping job: loose grit SiC, Atoma 140 and 400. Mind you, I sometimes lap deep dents and chips, and raw stones.

    My logic is, if you're gonna lap something with 120, then better get loose grit 80 SiC.

    W&D works too, but I get annoyed when I need to do heavy lapping, cos they wear and tear quickly, especially the lower grits.
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    Senior Member Brontosaurus's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. I see the logic of using w/d sandpaper on glass instead of the 120 stone, if one is going to be lapping the 120 stone on glass anyway. And I do have access to diamond plates and SiC powders. I was just wondering about using the 120 as an in-house lapping stone. Maybe 1000 and 4000 would stick together, while the 120 would have enough texture to prevent this from happening if used to lap the 1000 and the 4000?
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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesman7 View Post
    Lynn has good things to say about the economical series 1k. Why not use the 1k to lap the 3k, or the wet/dry to lap the both of them. My impression is that the stones are pretty soft and the fineness of the lapped surface will be immaterial.
    You might be thinking of the Traditional series, which Lynn also carries in his store. The economical series are a slightly different thing.

    If you already have diamond plates and SIC powder, why try to brute force a 120 grit hone into serving as a lapping plate? The only reason we can use diamond hones for lapping is A: they're (generally) very flat, and B: also a LOT harder than the hones/stones they're flattening. Since it's a hone, it will need flattening itself before it could be pressed into service as a lapping plate. And if it isn't (significantly) harder than the 1K or 4K then it will end up out of flat in short order.

    If it's just to have an 'in house' lapping stone, Naniwa makes one that will probably serve the purpose better.
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    Senior Member Brontosaurus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshal View Post
    If you already have diamond plates and SIC powder, why try to brute force a 120 grit hone into serving as a lapping plate?
    I was thinking about using them while on the road. The 120 stone is not very expensive and all three bought as a set involves a further discount. So I am curious as to the 120 stone's lapping ability as the Naniwa dedicated stone is rated at 220. Looks like they may be made of the same material, SiC.

    Edit: I have just now called a dealer of the stones, who does not recommend using the 120 on the other two. "Why is that?" I asked. They either couldn't say or didn't know. Further inquiry prompted the response that it wouldn't work because the binders of the 120 hone and the 220 dedicated lapping plate were different. Oh well...
    Last edited by Brontosaurus; 05-09-2017 at 12:03 AM.
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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshal View Post
    You might be thinking of the Traditional series, which Lynn also carries in his store. The economical series are a slightly different thing.
    You are correct, my bad.
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    Senior Member Brontosaurus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesman7 View Post
    You are correct, my bad.
    So which stones are you using? My understanding is that the Traditional series skips 3k from 1k or 1.5k and goes up to 6k. The Economical series is 1k > 3k and a little smaller. Color-wise (red to yellow) they seem the same.
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    Senior Member bluesman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brontosaurus View Post
    So which stones are you using? My understanding is that the Traditional series skips 3k from 1k or 1.5k and goes up to 6k. The Economical series is 1k > 3k and a little smaller. Color-wise (red to yellow) they seem the same.
    I don't use any of them, I just misremembered Lynn having good things to say about the traditional 1k.
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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluesman7 View Post
    You are correct, my bad.
    Eh, no harm no foul.

    I'm fairly sure the economical series could do the job. Their Traditional, Super Stone, and Chosera have all been given a nod as razor friendly 1K stones. Unless they got extra cheap with the binder there's probably no reason the economical series won't perform well too.

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