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Thread: Naniwa flattening stone question

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    Senior Member bruseth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marshal View Post
    CKTG sells a 400/1000 for under 40 bucks that will do everything you want. Or there's the tried and true DMT 325
    Sorry for being dense, but, 'CKTG' ? A sharpening supply store?


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    Senior Member bruseth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bruseth View Post
    Sorry for being dense, but, 'CKTG' ? A sharpening supply store?


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    And I'm equally sorry for not looking it up on Google prior to posting - Chef Knives To Go

    Thanks for the informative post.




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    Senior Member Iceni's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porl View Post
    Is this the one I need? D8C Continuous Diamond | The Perfect Edge

    Also I was wondering last night if I am having to do so much because I bought my razors shave ready. Maybe they were made shave ready using tape, and I am not using tape. I realise that the difference is very minimal but since I am using such a fine grit it might take more to get it to the point where it works well. Just a thought and I might just be talking nonsense here.

    Thank you all again for you help, not just with this but with everything. I see the same people coming up answering all of my silly questions and I am very grateful that you take the time to help noobs like me.
    It would depend on how much tape was used. I have some older razors that are near wedge that like 3 layers. In that instance you would struggle to get the 12K to touch up the edge, simply for the fact there would be a huge bevel without tape, and that volume of metal removal isn't going to happen quickly.

    For a regular ground razor that has perhaps had 1 layer of tape you should just go for it. Just watch for the razor undercutting the water, and you can always ink the edge with a marker pen to be 100% sure. The bevel in this instance is probably not going to be significantly larger.

    I have multiple ways to clear a 12K. I like the nylon pan scourers. I have the little rubbing block that used to come with the chosera line, and that is also pretty good. My favourite item to use is an optical glass block. They have nice chamfered corners, Absolutely no grit rating, and are very flat, I find a quick rub down with it removes pretty much all the swarf loading. They will scuff up a little if you use them on low grit hones, but for the 5-12K range the glass block serves me very well.

    Glass Block, 7.5 x 5 x 1.8cm. - Science First

    I'll flatten my stones when I think they need it, It's not very often to be fair. And certainly not every time I hone. Probably every 10 razors give or take. And when I do lap them off I like the diamond plate.
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    Senior Member Phoenix51's Avatar
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    Seldom use anything but 600 W/D sandpaper and a chunk of finished marble I got from a kitchen counter supply place. I have a DMT I used setting upa couple Arkansas stones, but everything else (coticule, Naniwa SS stones, BBW, Zulu Grey) all get the W/D treatment
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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porl View Post
    Is this the one I need? D8C Continuous Diamond | The Perfect Edge

    Also I was wondering last night if I am having to do so much because I bought my razors shave ready. Maybe they were made shave ready using tape, and I am not using tape. I realise that the difference is very minimal but since I am using such a fine grit it might take more to get it to the point where it works well. Just a thought and I might just be talking nonsense here.

    Thank you all again for you help, not just with this but with everything. I see the same people coming up answering all of my silly questions and I am very grateful that you take the time to help noobs like me.
    Yep, that's the DMT most start with. Can't really answer the tape question as I've never touched up a blade that had been taped by someone else and I tend to remember what amount I used. I've read that it shouldn't take much since it's a small difference in angle. Another possibility I've seen once in a while is someone using too little pressure and not really removing steel. Maybe try adding just a tiny bit of torque?

    Quote Originally Posted by bruseth View Post
    And I'm equally sorry for not looking it up on Google prior to posting - Chef Knives To Go

    Thanks for the informative post.




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    Yep that's the one. You'd think by now I would know better than to use shorthand when referring someone to a place or product.
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    To keep it simple, I use an Atoma 400, have used one for years. On my Naniwa's I like to have clean stone, so I do 6 figure 8's on the Atoma 400 before starting, even a brief 6 stroke touch up. The Atoma plate is flat, and by just doing the fig 8's you ensure your stones stay flat too. You don't have to be a pro to get full advantage out of an Atoma plate, they last and last. I have a dmt325 too, but I prefer the Atoma.
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    Senior Member Porl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceni View Post
    Just watch for the razor undercutting the water.
    That is really helpful. Having had a go using all of the advice here I could really see this happen. The stone fared much better too. I got myself a little scrubbing brick and I will get the DMT325 after my next payday. I guess that there is no real hurry for that now anyway.

    I now feel that this will only improve with practice bearing all this advice in mind.

    Once I have mastered this it will be on to the next thing. One step at a time.
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    Senior Member Iceni's Avatar
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    No there's no hurry at all for a diamond plate, Wet and dry paper on something flat like a granite worktop saver is more than enough. The diamond plate is more for convenience. You can use it and have it put away in a very short amount of time. It doesn't shed grit, and you don't have to check for left over loose grit on the face of the hone, And it can all be done over the sink. I didn't have a plate for well over a year when I started to hone.

    Wet and dry in comparison is a bit more time consuming, you have to get out the flat surface, You tend to work over a worktop that will need cleaning afterwards, And you will need to spray or splash water onto the Wet and dry paper as you work.

    Both systems should be considered, but the wet and dry method has more utility. It can be used on badly dished ebay natural stones, You can get more force onto the rock and a much longer swing. Meaning faster material removal. It's also cheap and the paper has many grit options. The next step up again in material removal is loose grit silicon carbide on a baking tray a method that is almost always reserved for the hardest of finishing rock like Arkansas and Charnley forest.
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    I use my Naniwa's under running water. It keeps them from clogging up and it enables me to do very smooth laps because it is gliding over the water. It also removes any particles on the stone. I was told that the water isn't the key to getting good results, it just keeps the pressure much lower because of the water cushion. It works for me and I find cleaning the stones much easier because the metal doesn't clog the stone.
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    If you are clogging up the 12k you may have to much pressure. Try lapping it under running water.
    I had the discussion with Lynn and he said the running water reduces the friction between the blade and water by cushioning it. That's why my results are better. Less pressure on finishing stones is key.

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