Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
Like Tree16Likes

Thread: Yanagiba polishing

  1. #1
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    13,939
    Thanked: 3302

    Default Yanagiba polishing

    I bought myself an inexpensive yanagiba for a practice polish. It was pretty crooked so I straightened it up & have started working on the ura (back hollow).

    I started at 800 grit but now I'm using the 280 grit stone in the picture. The diagonal grind lines are slow to go. My hat's off to the guys that do this all the time.

    Started at the 2 ends & meeting towards the rear atm. Not sure if I'll go coarser or stick with the 280 for now. Will be glad when I finish the 'hard' side .
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Hirlau and Vasilis like this.
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

  2. #2
    Chasing the Edge WadePatton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    920
    Thanked: 117

    Default

    great, now i have two knives to polish. just what i needed...

  3. #3
    Scheerlijk Laurens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    The Hague, the Netherlands
    Posts
    1,184
    Thanked: 164

    Default

    If you don't mind my asking, to what end do you polish it? Just for the looks? I am completely ignorant in the world of knives.
    I want a lather whip

  4. #4
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    13,939
    Thanked: 3302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurens View Post
    If you don't mind my asking, to what end do you polish it? Just for the looks? I am completely ignorant in the world of knives.
    I don't know that polishing is the right word.
    The idea is to create an even hollow on the back so that the bevels are tiny on spine & edge. It makes for longevity, good geometry & easy sharpening.
    The front polishing is both cosmetic & also to create a certain visual effect on the fish by the way the oils react to the cut that won't happen with other knives not polished traditionally.

    The final sharpening is of course part of the process too.
    ScottGoodman likes this.
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

  5. #5
    Scheerlijk Laurens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    The Hague, the Netherlands
    Posts
    1,184
    Thanked: 164

    Default

    Thanks! So you really put it flat on the hone? That sounds pretty tough for me, considering I used 3 layers of tape on my near wedge.
    I want a lather whip

  6. #6
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    13,939
    Thanked: 3302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurens View Post
    Thanks! So you really put it flat on the hone? That sounds pretty tough for me, considering I used 3 layers of tape on my near wedge.
    The back is hollow so I used the tips of the stones in the picture to evenly do small amounts at a time. After the 800 I used some wetndri paper up to 2000 grit to smooth it more. Next will be small Jnat pieces called Hazuya or Jizuya to colour & further refine the back. Haven't started the front of the knife yet.

    When I hone it, this side will be laid flat on the stone & fingers X'd, will result in small bevels at spine & edge
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by onimaru55; 01-17-2014 at 12:35 AM.
    ScottGoodman and Chevhead like this.
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

  7. #7
    Scheerlijk Laurens's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    The Hague, the Netherlands
    Posts
    1,184
    Thanked: 164

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by onimaru55 View Post
    The back is hollow so I used the tips of the stones in the picture to evenly do small amounts at a time. After the 800 I used some wetndri paper up to 2000 grit to smooth it more. Next will be small Jnat pieces called Hazuya or Jizuya to colour & further refine the back. Haven't started the front of the knife yet.

    When I hone it, this side will be laid flat on the stone & fingers X'd, will result in small bevels at spine & edge
    I see, nice! I look forward to seeing the results. You prefer to do this by hand rather than using a buffer?
    I want a lather whip

  8. #8
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    13,939
    Thanked: 3302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurens View Post
    I see, nice! I look forward to seeing the results. You prefer to do this by hand rather than using a buffer?
    I probably could have used a buffer on some areas to speed things up but certainly not near the tip.
    On the omote where the front needs to be flat above the shinogi line, a stone is probably best. Depending on how wobbly the bevel is a belt sander or stone will be my choice to remove any dips.
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

  9. #9
    Senior Member blabbermouth
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Roseville,Kali
    Posts
    10,432
    Thanked: 2023

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurens View Post
    I see, nice! I look forward to seeing the results. You prefer to do this by hand rather than using a buffer?
    Using a buffer on fine Japanese steel? dear lord save me.
    Lemur likes this.
    CAUTION
    Dangerous within 1 Mile

  10. #10
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    13,939
    Thanked: 3302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pixelfixed View Post
    Using a buffer on fine Japanese steel? dear lord save me.
    It's the application of the tool that is important. This knife was originally ground on a huge belt sander after all.
    I was thinking a 2" wheel & some greaseless compound my have saved some of the 180 grit drudge work prior to hand sanding.
    Some of these cheaper knives are about as straight as a washboard but of course on fine Japanese steel it would not even be necessary.
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •