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Thread: Wooden Cutting Boards

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    Default Wooden Cutting Boards

    Gentlemen:
    As a wedding gift (just over 11 years ago!) my wife's great uncle gave us (really me, my wife can't cook a lick!) a beautiful maple cutting board he made himself. For since forgotten reasons - it has sat in a closet, unused. I broke it out, put it on our counter, and want to use it. Wood being wood, it has moved a bit, and needs some care. My plan is to hand plane the bottom to flatten it (it rocks a bit) and use a card scraper to re-ferbish the top (the glue seams are a bit raised) After scraping the top, I want to recondition it. I have no experience with wood boards, and I have two questions to any out there in the know:

    -What should I use to treat the top (wax? oil? nothing?)

    -What is the day to day care regimen (clean/rinse or not? that sort of thing)

    I know I can research this pretty easily, but from many of the threads in this sub-forum, I know threre are cooks and foodies out there that have some good advise.

    Thanks a lot - Gags

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    Mortal Member bombay's Avatar
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    I don't know about wood, but chop it up and make razor scales!!!
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    The boards I've seen have a bare finish and then they use some finish type liquid made for cutting boards. You don't want to use anything you wouldn't want to eat or some oil which may become rancid over time. Day to day use is just wash of with some soap and water and dry thoroughly.
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    Senior Member MrMagnus's Avatar
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    I have a boardsmith, i use his boardbutter.

    here you can read about board care
    The Board Smith

    and here you can buy the butter
    The Board Smith
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    //Magnus


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    No that's not me in the picture RoyalCake's Avatar
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    We've had a couple over the years, and the suggested coatings have been beeswax or mineral oil. They've both done good for us, but mineral oil is a lot cheaper. Like spendur said, you gotta put something non-toxic on there! haha
    I love living in the past...

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    Senior Member MrMagnus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigspendur View Post
    The boards I've seen have a bare finish and then they use some finish type liquid made for cutting boards. You don't want to use anything you wouldn't want to eat or some oil which may become rancid over time. Day to day use is just wash of with some soap and water and dry thoroughly.
    Bees Wax mixed with Food Safe Mineral Oil is what most use.
    Last edited by MrMagnus; 07-08-2013 at 10:56 PM.
    //Magnus


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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyalCake View Post
    We've had a couple over the years, and the suggested coatings have been beeswax or mineral oil. They've both done good for us, but mineral oil is a lot cheaper. Like spendur said, you gotta put something non-toxic on there! haha
    I have two big slabs of bee's wax - I take shavings and dissolve them in mineral spirits to use as a final finish/polish for my woodworking projects. Obviously don't want to use the stuff with mineral spirts, but is there a trick to using the wax alone - or just rub it on and buff it out?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMagnus View Post
    I have a boardsmith, i use his boardbutter.

    here you can read about board care
    The Board Smith

    and here you can buy the butter
    The Board Smith

    These links are very helpful - thanks a lot!

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    Senior Member tiddle's Avatar
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    Mineral oil and clean w/ distilled vinegar every so often, remember any finish on it will be getting cut into; and being transfered to your knives and food. Stick with the mineral oil once a week for the finish, and maybe once a month clean w/ distilled vinegar and buff w/ a little bess wax to help keep the wood from splitting
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    Senior Member tiddle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joegags View Post
    I have two big slabs of bee's wax - I take shavings and dissolve them in mineral spirits to use as a final finish/polish for my woodworking projects. Obviously don't want to use the stuff with mineral spirts, but is there a trick to using the wax alone - or just rub it on and buff it out?
    You could try substituting w/ grain alcohol to cut it, makes it food safe, as well as mixing it w/ shellac instead of denatured alcohol (the grain alcohol makes the shellac a food safe coating; it's used as coatings on candy and pharmaceuticals aka...time released coatings)
    Mastering implies there is nothing more for you to learn of something... I prefer proficient enough to not totally screw it up.

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