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manah

  1. William and John Birks.

    by , 11-24-2011 at 12:24 AM
    Quote Originally Posted by manah View Post
    So, it's not G. Johnson's mark. I couldn't find a dart near the pipe.
    And it's not a Wostenholm razor, it's not his pipe.
    And now. I'll try to tell my idea.
    I believe the razor was made by William and John Birks.
    It was a very old Sheffield company. The founder was William Birks, who became Master Cutler in 1766. At the beginning it was Birks, Withers & Sykes. It was one of the first enterprises to register a silver mark in 1773. It has a complicated genealogy,
    ...
  2. Boker Tree.

    by , 11-22-2011 at 10:39 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by manah View Post
    First of all, in 1925, the chestnut tree which inspired the "Tree Brand", was struck by lightning and burned. It's a historical fact.
    As for me, I'm sure, "1926" isn't the year of production.
    I saw Boker razors without "tree", that were made before and after 1926.
  3. Henry Godfrey Lamb Long.

    by , 11-22-2011 at 10:39 PM
    Quote Originally Posted by manah View Post
    The company was founded by Henry Godfrey Lamb Long. He first appeared in Sheffield directories in 1828, working from Arundel Street. By 1834, Wragg, Long & Co was listed as a merchant, factor, and manufacturer, which also dealt as a converter and refiner of steel. Long's partner was George Wragg, who lived at Stone Grove. Wragg, Long was based in Eyre Street and within a few years was dealing in table cutlery, besides steel. However, George Wragg died on 15 May 1841, aged 50, and the business
    ...
  4. Packwood razors.

    by , 07-14-2011 at 01:25 AM
    It's very difficult to find any info about the Packwood razors maker. I vainly spent much time to find some info.
    More importantly, Henry L. Lummus, in his article wrote:
    "Date 1828. Maker, unknown, Sheffield. Trademark "Packwood".

    Updated 07-15-2011 at 09:17 AM by manah

    Categories
    History of razors manufacturers.
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