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Thread: The Butcher Shop

  1. #1611
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    Quote Originally Posted by omgmarclol View Post
    it's good that you found a razor that works well for you!
    for me, i find that i don't really need to apply any difference in pressure with a wedge v. a hollow grind. i find adjusting the shaving angle to find the optimal blade contact works much better for me than increasing pressure, which isn't necessarily something i would want to do if i were trying to ease irritation. but your beard and skin is different from mine so; so my technique may not necessarily be best for you.
    Yes, I agree with you. We are very individual and each has a different type of skin and hair. In confirmation I will say that I just do not really care what angle the razor tilts to the skin, just at the first pass through the hair growth it is slightly larger, and at the second pass against the hair growth - a little less and everything, but the pressure on the razor greatly affects the damage skin.

    And it seems to me unusual that some of the hair grows on the neck (left and right of the Adam's apple, under the cheekbones) not from top to bottom, as shown in all the pictures and instructions. Hair grows from left to right and it's very inconvenient for me to shave because the razor has to be turned vertically here! Therefore, I give a lot of attention when choosing a razor to such aspects as its shape, nose shape, length and width of the blade - just to get the razor to reach the bristles and shave it off without touching the cheekbones or the chin because they interfere.

  2. #1612
    Senior Member blabbermouth ejmolitor37's Avatar
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    What a beauty Phrank! Congrats on a fine piece of equipment. I need to get after my W&B FBO! Been sitting for a month or so and that's too long!
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  3. #1613
    Senior Member blabbermouth engine46's Avatar
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    Phrank, I'm going to be making some more bone scales soon. I'm so glad I bought extra bleached white bone when I did because that seller hasn't had it for a long time now.
    That's a beauty! How thin did he make the scales?
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  4. #1614
    barba crescit caput nescit Phrank's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by engine46 View Post
    Phrank, I'm going to be making some more bone scales soon. I'm so glad I bought extra bleached white bone when I did because that seller hasn't had it for a long time now.
    That's a beauty! How thin did he make the scales?
    Karl's work is truly superb, the bone scales as well as the faux tortoise scales he did for my Lancet and Elliot, are razor thin.

    If one didn't know any better, the bone for all intents and purposes looks like ivory, and the faux tortoise, to this day I'm still gobsmacked at the material and what he did with it, beside my Mk. 32 in real tortoise scales, it's very difficult to tell the difference, the scale thinness is essentially the same - incredibly detailed craftsmanship.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth engine46's Avatar
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    Yeah when I first worked with bone, they were thick, then I broke one so I made a duplicate then I made them thinner until I was satisfied but they are as thin as Ivory scales & strong too.
    Last edited by engine46; 09-27-2017 at 03:01 PM.
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  6. #1616
    MrZ
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    Can anyone tell me why some of the FBU's say "Wade & Butcher" and some say "Wade & Butcher's"? It seems strange that they would change the stamping on the blade for no reason. Is there a known date when this stamping change occurred?
    Thank you for in advance for the information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phrank View Post
    Time to add my latest Wade & Butcher, The Celebrated Hollow Ground Razor, For Barber's Use, to the Shop...restored magnificently by Karlej and scaled in bone.

    Attachment 274341
    That is GORGEOUS!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #1618
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrZ View Post
    Can anyone tell me why some of the FBU's say "Wade & Butcher" and some say "Wade & Butcher's"? It seems strange that they would change the stamping on the blade for no reason. Is there a known date when this stamping change occurred?
    Thank you for in advance for the information.
    That's got a complicated answer.

    Partly, these were sometimes made decades apart. Stamps wore out and had to be restruck. Later W&B's used etchings instead of stamps, and the resist masks for etchings could comparatively easily be changed up on a whim.

    Also at play is the fact that not all Wade & Butcher razors were made in William & Samuel's factory. While 'name brand' manufacturers had their own establishments, the workers very often worked for multiple different manufacturers simultaneously and did work for the one who currently had work to give them. It was nothing like a modern factory, where there's always work to be done. The Sheffield work system relied on orders for products, and when there were no orders, the factory could sit unused. It was entirely normal for a foreman (called a Little Master, or M'ester) to do work for one manufacturer in another's factory with their toolings.
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  9. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Voidmonster For This Useful Post:

    Dieseld (09-27-2017), engine46 (09-27-2017), MrZ (09-27-2017), outback (09-27-2017)

  10. #1619
    Junior Member omgmarclol's Avatar
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    Beautiful piece. The bone is very elegant.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phrank View Post
    Time to add my latest Wade & Butcher, The Celebrated Hollow Ground Razor, For Barber's Use, to the Shop...restored magnificently by Karlej and scaled in bone.

    Attachment 274341
    engine46, outback and Dieseld like this.

  11. #1620
    Senior Member blabbermouth engine46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voidmonster View Post
    That's got a complicated answer.

    Partly, these were sometimes made decades apart. Stamps wore out and had to be restruck. Later W&B's used etchings instead of stamps, and the resist masks for etchings could comparatively easily be changed up on a whim.

    Also at play is the fact that not all Wade & Butcher razors were made in William & Samuel's factory. While 'name brand' manufacturers had their own establishments, the workers very often worked for multiple different manufacturers simultaneously and did work for the one who currently had work to give them. It was nothing like a modern factory, where there's always work to be done. The Sheffield work system relied on orders for products, and when there were no orders, the factory could sit unused. It was entirely normal for a foreman (called a Little Master, or M'ester) to do work for one manufacturer in another's factory with their toolings.

    I imagine that's why there were so many razor makers in Sheffield or so to say..............
    Dieseld likes this.
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