Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
Like Tree30Likes

Thread: Blue Wonder - IS it real, Are they good?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Daekkon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Gresham, Oregon
    Posts
    165
    Thanked: 9

    Default Blue Wonder - IS it real, Are they good?

    I'm looking at buying a blue wonder that some one got from an estate sale.

    I was hoping some one could give me a little info on this guy, Age, quality, apparent condition. ect.

    Name:  $T2eC16d,!)sFIY2w3NqTBSVWcD,e+w~~60_57.jpg
Views: 805
Size:  77.4 KBName:  $(KGrHqZ,!ooFJQu,E-0kBSVWb1Qvng~~60_57.jpg
Views: 737
Size:  75.3 KBName:  $(KGrHqV,!lEFJGIJ4TbvBSVWcJ5je!~~60_57.jpg
Views: 745
Size:  51.6 KBName:  $(KGrHqN,!lMFJTk4MJC9BSVWbhethw~~60_57.jpg
Views: 740
Size:  90.2 KBName:  $(KGrHqF,!n0FJLrZGF(TBSVWbtqfwQ~~60_57.jpg
Views: 753
Size:  60.4 KBName:  $T2eC16R,!yYFIc9OOLQYBSVWb85cng~~60_57.jpg
Views: 764
Size:  83.5 KB

    Any info would be much appreciated.
    Geezer, Hirlau and Oscroft like this.

  2. #2
    Senior Member blabbermouth RezDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    9,365
    Thanked: 2849

    Default

    Well it looks to be in good condition. It is a vintage blade from a reputable area. If you buy it send it out for honing and shazzam you are ready to shave. It looks like no hone wear and original finish square point about 6/8. Nothing else I can add, but I'll bet someone more knowledgeable will be around.

  3. #3
    Senior Member blabbermouth
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,872
    Thanked: 2253

    Default

    There is info here Anybody used a Blue Wonder? . The one you have is vintage and like new from the photos. It has a blued tang and spine that does not look like it is even faded. I'd go further and guess that may even be the factory edge. To me it is a quality piece in prime condition only judging by a few photos though.

    Bob
    gssixgun and Geezer like this.
    After listening to someone talk ever wonder who ties their shoe laces?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Daekkon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Gresham, Oregon
    Posts
    165
    Thanked: 9

    Default

    Very cool, thanks for the info.

    Ill give it a shot. i was going to grab a coticule and a golden dollar razor to practice with, although i have a lot of experience honing knifes, Ive never honed a straight razor before.

  5. #5
    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Sandpoint, Idaho
    Posts
    25,279
    Thanked: 12448
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    They are exceptional shavers, and that is in near mint condition... PLEASE do not mess up that razor learning to hone that would be a Cardinal Sin

  6. #6
    Senior Member blabbermouth
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,872
    Thanked: 2253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daekkon View Post
    Very cool, thanks for the info.

    Ill give it a shot. i was going to grab a coticule and a golden dollar razor to practice with, although i have a lot of experience honing knifes, Ive never honed a straight razor before.
    Please forget that you have a lot of experience honing knives, it is "not" the same as honing straights. Approach honing a straight as if you have never honed a knife and are learning a completely new art. There have been a few guys with knife honing experience join the site and have posted latter that honing a straight was more difficult than they anticipated with their prior knife hone expertise.

    Step away from that Blue Diamond with hones until you have gained enough skill not to take a chance on damaging the beautiful razor. A vintage razor in that condition and of that quality is definitely not a practice honing razor candidate. By all means practice on a cheap razor or two and I don't mean a Gold Dollar. The Gold Dollar is on the sites avoid list for a reason.

    Bob
    Geezer, Martin103 and Phrank like this.
    After listening to someone talk ever wonder who ties their shoe laces?

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to BobH For This Useful Post:

    Geezer (10-14-2013)

  8. #7
    Historically Inquisitive Martin103's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    5,925
    Thanked: 4181
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Very nice looking in wonderful condition. The Blue Wonder trademark belongs to Ewald Plumacher of Solingen Germany. As far as dating your razor the earliest entry that i found was 1928, and also found an advertisement from 1950. Nevertheless enjoy this gem!
    Name:  blue wonder razor1.JPG
Views: 810
Size:  26.0 KB
    Name:  blue wonder plumacher 1950.JPG
Views: 726
Size:  28.7 KB
    gssixgun likes this.

  9. #8
    Administrator Lynn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri, United States
    Posts
    8,449
    Thanked: 4918
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    I have honed a few of these over the years and every one was an outstanding shaver. As already stated, the one you pictured looks to be in great shape. Get it before someone else does........


  10. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Liverpool, UK
    Posts
    160
    Thanked: 14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    Please forget that you have a lot of experience honing knives, it is "not" the same as honing straights.
    I started honing razors quite recently after years of honing knives and tools, and I agree in part with that - it is indeed not the same, but I don't think there's any need to forget it. I do think having the experience can be a help, as long as you know it's going to be different and are able to switch off your knife-honing muscle memory - for me the switch-off happens naturally anyway, because I'm just not holding the razor the same way.

    From my experience, I already knew a fair bit about steel, bevels, angles, burrs, wire edges, stone progressions etc, and that definitely helped me - even if not that much in practice, it did mean I knew what everyone was talking about.

    I actually found razor-honing in some ways easier than knife-honing, because you have the gift of the spine to get exactly the right angle, and my results so far have been very positive.

    And in one case my knife-honing experience was more directly helpful, after I got a razor that had quite a big chip in the edge. I honed it out freehand with the spine off the stone, the way I do with knives, and then set a new bevel the usual razor way - that saved a fair bit of time over doing it flat on the spine or fannying around with tape. (I know it will also have changed the bevel angle a little, but just doing it once and then going back to normal spine-flat honing will only make a very small difference.)

    Alan
    Last edited by Oscroft; 10-15-2013 at 08:43 AM.
    BobH likes this.

  11. #10
    Senior Member blabbermouth
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    12,872
    Thanked: 2253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oscroft View Post
    I started honing razors quite recently after years of honing knives and tools, and I agree in part with that - it is indeed not the same, but I don't think there's any need to forget it. I do think having the experience can be a help, as long as you know it's going to be different and are able to switch off your knife-honing muscle memory - for me the switch-off happens naturally anyway, because I'm just not holding the razor the same way.

    From my experience, I already knew a fair bit about steel, bevels, angles, burrs, wire edges, stone progressions etc, and that definitely helped me - even if not that much in practice, it did mean I knew what everyone was talking about.

    I actually found razor-honing in some ways easier than knife-honing, because you have the gift of the spine to get exactly the right angle, and my results so far have been very positive.

    And in one case my knife-honing experience was more directly helpful, after I got a razor that had quite a big chip in the edge. I honed it out freehand with the spine off the stone, the way I do with knives, and then set a new bevel the usual razor way - that saved a fair bit of time over doing it flat on the spine or fannying around with tape. (I know it will also have changed the bevel angle a little, but just doing it once and then going back to normal spine-flat honing will only make a very small difference.)

    Alan
    I totally agree with what you said. The problem lies when people can't check at the door a certain assumption that having previous experience in a related skill brings. In other words, don't get too cocky it may hinder more than help.

    Bob
    After listening to someone talk ever wonder who ties their shoe laces?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •