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  1. #1
    Gentleman in Training Pathogen's Avatar
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    Default If Double Arrows weren't $10...

    If Double Arrows weren't $10 on eBay, and you had to judge the cost solely on the quality of the shave you got from them, how much would you pay for one? I'm just curious

  2. #2
    Senior Member Navaja's Avatar
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    If you like 6/8" razors, don't mind the cheap scales, and know how to get a good edge on them, they're as good as any.
    And if you happen to drop one, or hit the sink faucet with it, you won't loose too much.

  3. #3
    When did we get a disco ball? paulallen's Avatar
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    What's a double arrow?

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    Senior Member GhostRida's Avatar
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    it's a cheaper chinese made razor, it's sold on ebay for around $10.
    i have one, not bad.

  5. #5
    When did we get a disco ball? paulallen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostRida View Post
    it's a cheaper chinese made razor, it's sold on ebay for around $10.
    i have one, not bad.
    Ah i see. Thanks

  6. #6
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    I was just commenting to another shaver that the double arrows that Stamps sells on e-bay are worth way more than their cost. I have a couple of them and they are very good performers.
    I would not hesitate to put one in a newbie kit.
    The scales may not be elegant but they are plenty good enough and the razors are cheap enough that I can actually consider trying my hand at rescaling them. Seven day set anyone?

  7. #7
    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
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    The only draw back that I have noticed honing them for others, (no I don't own one) besides the scales of course, is that about 30% have a high shoulder problem that lifts the edge off the hone by the heel, if you use a heel forward honing stroke. A little Dremel work fixes it but if you are not in the position to do that, it can be a pain on the hones.... They seem to take a nice edge, but would defer to actual owners opinions, on how long that edge lasts....

  8. #8
    Shaves like a pirate jockeys's Avatar
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    i'd pay a bit more. maybe 25 bucks. remember that you are buying just a blade. the scales are so awful as to be completely unuseable. (some of mine have fallen off, some touch the blade when closed, etc)

    the blade can be a little challenging to sharpen, it's a big smiler, but not too bad. rusts real easy and doesn't hold it's edge quite as long as others I've used, but pretty easy to work with overall.

  9. #9
    Coticule researcher
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    I have 33 of them. (read the honing survey/contest thread, in case you wonder why...)

    But before that, I owned 8. They all came to me to in the same condition. (So did the extra 25, judged upon a quick inspection)

    I use them for honing experiments. So far, whatever method and combination of hones I used, I haven't encountered any problems with the steel alloy and/or temper.

    The scales have the quality of a cheap toy. Worse.

    They all have the problem that Glen noted. They don't have a "hone clearance" area at the schoulder. One could also look at this from the opposite direction and state that the edge is running to far up to the tang. One solution is to grind the shoulder down a bit. The other is to remove a small amount of the edge. I've attached a picture. The left razor is the Double Arrow. You can clearly see the difference with most other razors. The green line marks how the edge could be altered to remedifie the problem. The DA in the picture is already modified a bit. Starting the stroke very diagonally will hone this one, but it's not ideal.

    They all come with a smile. A bit of a sloppy smile, but it will do.
    Honing them takes more than to thrifty refine and finish an already keen bevel.
    When properly honed, they are great shavers. Typically 3/4 hollow grind.

    Some hard edges on the tang and at the far end of the blade are not smoothened. The hard egde at the far end may cause scratches on the leather during stropping. This issue can be quicky resolved with a piece of very fine sandpaper (600+ grit), or with a Coticule formstone (as I did, but any small and rounded high-grit hone will do).

    The tail of the Double Arrow is the most fitting to my hands I encountered so far. Always a nice and stable grip during the shave.

    Are they worth more than $10? The question comes down to what you want to pay for a "razor kit"? Do you like tweaking razors? Polishing a satin brushed look to a high gloss? Get creative with scales design and production? Then, imo, you can't go wrong with a Double Arrow.
    Are you looking for a cheap solution for honing practice? Then my advice is to pay a small bit more for a simple but decent vintage razor in fair condition.

    Bart.
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