Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 34
Like Tree14Likes

Thread: W. Greaves & Sons

  1. #11
    Junior Member JazzDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Central PA, USA
    Posts
    12
    Thanked: 4

    Default

    A restored Wm. Greaves & Sons with eagle etching and spine tooling. 15/16" width. Original horn scales replaced with black horn scales.

    Name:  Greaves & Sons 15_16ths etched_a.jpg
Views: 102
Size:  43.7 KB
    Mark Polis, M.D., a.k.a., Mark
    He is the best physician who is the most ingenious inspirer of hope__S. T. Coleridge

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to JazzDoc For This Useful Post:

    ejmolitor37 (11-20-2017)

  3. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    East Central Illinois
    Posts
    686
    Thanked: 83

    Default

    I think this is a regrind from a near wedge because of that stub tail.

    Slawman

  4. #13
    Junior Member JazzDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Central PA, USA
    Posts
    12
    Thanked: 4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slawman View Post
    I think this is a regrind from a near wedge because of that stub tail.

    Slawman
    Do you think the etching and spine tooling are original, @Slawman?
    Mark Polis, M.D., a.k.a., Mark
    He is the best physician who is the most ingenious inspirer of hope__S. T. Coleridge

  5. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    East Central Illinois
    Posts
    686
    Thanked: 83

    Default

    I take back what I said about a regrind.

  6. #15
    Senior Member silverloaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    vermont
    Posts
    770
    Thanked: 203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slawman View Post
    I take back what I said about a regrind.
    If you were talking about the razor the op posted in 2009, yes it's reground, and likely the bottom of the tang is reshaped. The restored Greaves "American Razor" is not reground, and such a nice deep original Eagle Etch and Slogan in the scallops of the spine, lovely!
    Silverloaf

  7. #16
    Junior Member JazzDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Central PA, USA
    Posts
    12
    Thanked: 4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Slawman View Post
    I take back what I said about a regrind.
    @Slawman, what about the tail suggested it was reground and why did you change your mind?

    Quote Originally Posted by silverloaf View Post
    If you were talking about the razor the op posted in 2009, yes it's reground, and likely the bottom of the tang is reshaped. The restored Greaves "American Razor" is not reground, and such a nice deep original Eagle Etch and Slogan in the scallops of the spine, lovely!
    How can you guys identify a regrind?
    Teach me something here!!

  8. #17
    Senior Member silverloaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    vermont
    Posts
    770
    Thanked: 203

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzDoc View Post


    How can you guys identify a regrind?
    Teach me something here!!
    Not sure I can teach anyone anything but here are a few thoughts. In my opinion the best place to start is looking at a LOT of razors, compare them in terms of what you most commonly see vs unusual findings for similar/dissimilar marked and/or shaped blades. read what others have said regarding those blades, shapes, grinds from the particular timeframe for each blade in question (Not everything written here is accurate and many times newer findings clarified earlier inaccuracies or misunderstandings so diligence is required when sifting through old posts here). I've been somewhat prone to jumping the gun myself and have inserted a foot or two into a wide open mouth
    I personally Also look for obvious and blatant differences in surface texture, often regarding tangs and blade faces this can be more readily observed in person than in pics so I purchase an insane amount of blades just to examine sometimes. The level of Oxidation and the pattern it presents in are sometimes telling on more well executed regrinds. Traces of a blade etch under obvious grind lines are a dead giveaway.....
    well, I guess after writing this far it will best to post pics for illustration purposes. I'll post a few pics later on.......
    Last edited by silverloaf; 11-20-2017 at 10:37 PM. Reason: misspelling
    Voidmonster likes this.
    Silverloaf

  9. #18
    Junior Member JazzDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Central PA, USA
    Posts
    12
    Thanked: 4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silverloaf View Post
    Not sure I can teach anyone anything but here are a few thoughts. In my opinion the best place to start is looking at a LOT of razors, compare them in terms of what you most commonly see vs unusual findings for similar/dissimilar marked and/or shaped blades. read what others have said regarding those blades, shapes, grinds from the particular timeframe for each blade in question (Not everything written here is accurate and many times newer findings clarified earlier inaccuracies or misunderstandings so diligence is required when sifting through old posts here). I've been somewhat prone to jumping the gun myself and have inserted a foot or two into a wide open mouth
    I personally Also look for obvious and blatant differences in surface texture, often regarding tangs and blade faces this can be more readily observed in person than in pics so I purchase an insane amount of blades just to examine sometimes. The level of Oxidation and the pattern it presents in are sometimes telling on more well executed regrinds. Traces of a blade etch under obvious grind lines are a dead giveaway.....
    well, I guess after writing this far it will best to post pics for illustration purposes. I'll post a few pics later on.......
    Thanks, silverloaf! Appreciate the explanation and hope you can post some pics when you get a chance.
    Mark Polis, M.D., a.k.a., Mark
    He is the best physician who is the most ingenious inspirer of hope__S. T. Coleridge

  10. #19
    Senior Member silverloaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    vermont
    Posts
    770
    Thanked: 203
    Silverloaf

  11. #20
    Senior Member silverloaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    vermont
    Posts
    770
    Thanked: 203

    Default

    Regrinds have historical backing and can be beneficial in some cases but discretion again needs to applied here, since it certainly could erase some historical significance doing a regrind and details of a blades origin can be lost. Abating the spread of oxidation, evening up hone wear, making honing an easier task, correcting a fault in a blade. These have all been used as reasons for regrinding.
    As seen in some of my pics here a regrind does not always mean hollow grinding a blade either. This is the far more attractive option to someone like me when a regrind is decided upon. If a blade is a near wedge when I commence a regrind it remains a near wedge when I've finished the regrind. As little surface metal removed as possible is my general rule.
    p.s, the top pic shows some regrinds along with some hat are obviously hollow ground intentionally, and etched.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Silverloaf

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •