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Thread: Something not in the wiki. :)

  1. #11
    Historically Inquisitive Martin103's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Miller View Post
    The only thing that springs to mind is that the tang stamp to be made before noticing the mistake, but decided to use it anyway?!
    The tang stamp was cheaper with less letters, thats my theory.
    Last edited by Martin103; 03-26-2013 at 01:11 PM.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    In fact there was a company - W & S Horabin (one 'r') - Indian Traders!

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    Strangely enough, Tweedales definitive reference work, quoted verbatim by Alex, above, does not mention that W & S Horrabin (two 'r's) were razor manufacturers, although it mentions bowie knives, pen knives, pocket knives and sportsmans knives. It does however mention that they were also 'merchants' - ie factors for goods made by other people, so we really do not know whether W & S Horrabin made the razors that their name was affixed to!

    Tweedale also mentions that the Horrabin mark passed on to John Baker when W & S Horrabin were liquidated in 1884. John Baker is recorded by Tweedale as being a maker of table and spring knives, and he quotes an 1879 advertisement concerned with table cutlery. The firm later sold electro-plated ware (eg silver plated cutlery, flatware, hollow-ware, etc) - razors were not plated. Tweedale says Baker filed for bankruptcy in 1893, so he had W & S Horrabin's mark for less than 10 years.

    The W . S. (or, W & S) Horabin indian traders seems to have its roots going back to around 1898/1902. The logo on the single-r Horabin's Phoenix looks far more rustic and crude than that of W & S Horrabins stylised mark, so perhaps this was a conscious decision to trade on the fame of the earlier, established company (we know from Tweedale that they had an office in John Street New York, and they were also stocked by merchants such as Brownson, Slocum and Hopkins of 26 Dey Street, NY). Not only was the Thoreau, McKinley County building a trading post, it stocked general hardware too, so razors are a distinct possibility. The Horabin who bought the Thoreau trading post (as a partner) was called William S. Horabin. One of the store's assistants was Stanley Horabin, hence W & S Horabin and W S Horabin. W & S Horabin ceased to have had anything to do with the store circa 1913.

    The idea that there was both a W & S Horabin and a W & S Horrabin is more of an interesting diversion than anything else, I suppose.

    Regards,
    Neil
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  4. #13
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    Neil, What do you think about these razors stacking up against other sheffields? Is the quality still there in the one "R" Horabin Phoenix razors?

  5. #14
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Quote Originally Posted by brooksie967 View Post
    Neil, What do you think about these razors stacking up against other sheffields? Is the quality still there in the one "R" Horabin Phoenix razors?
    I wish I knew - I have not had the pleasure of trying either!

    Regards,
    Neil

  6. #15
    Senior Member Wolfpack34's Avatar
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    Here is a 7/8 'Horrabin' (with 2 'RR's ) that I have, stamped RED HILL WORKS, and I will tell you that it is a wonderful shaver! The scales are pressed horn in perfect condition and are stamped 'CONGRESS RAZOR' on one side and 'INDEPENDENCE' on the other. I have since restored this and it is one of my 'FAV's'!

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    Last edited by Wolfpack34; 09-08-2013 at 08:19 PM.

  7. #16
    Historically Inquisitive Martin103's Avatar
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    Wow that quite the find right there, right up my alley, the blade looks great but the pressed horn scales look like they were done yesterday.
    You dont come across that very often, Enjoy!

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