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Thread: This Joseph Smith looks pretty old to me.

  1. #1
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    Default This Joseph Smith looks pretty old to me.

    Ive been into straight razors ever since i first saw my Dad shave with one. However, I've never owned one until today maybe you fellas can shine some light on this one for me. Be forewarned, she ain't perty
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  2. #2
    Moderator Hirlau's Avatar
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    Welcome.
    Here's a little info. , scroll down to J. Smith & Son.
    Straight Razor Manufacturers and Dates of Operation

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    dapperdan61 (04-11-2013)

  4. #3
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    I haven't seen any other razors that just say Joseph Smith Sheffield (without and son) on them as of yet. Does this mean that it could be a very early production model?

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    Maybe, or it's a space thing in reference to the tang. We have guys that will see your post later & give you more details, this is all I know.

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    By 1852, the enterprise became "& Sons" - presumably with the addition of Joseph's son John.
    Alex Ts.

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    Hirlau (04-11-2013)

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    Joseph Smith was a razor manufacturer, who was born in about 1785. The Company of Cutlers recorded the apprenticeship of Joseph Smith to his father, Isaac Smith, a razor maker in Stannington. Joseph was granted his Freedom in 1810. He first appeared in a Sheffield directory in 1833, trading from Radford Street. By 1852, the enterprise became "& Sons" - presumably with the addition of Joseph's son John. The enterprise employed ten men and three boys. By the late 1870s, it had moved to Solly Street. The trademark was "Joseph Smith & Sons, Celebrated Razors", above "3415" (granted in 1810). By 1887, the name and mark had been acquired by Joseph Allen & Sons.
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    Alex Ts.

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    Manah, you always seem to be able to dig up the most impressive detailed history on straight razors information, how do you do it? Always a pleasure reading your posts, and thank you for sharing.
    Regards, Tony

    Quote Originally Posted by manah View Post
    Joseph Smith was a razor manufacturer, who was born in about
    1785. The Company of Cutlers recorded the apprenticeship of Joseph Smith to his father, Isaac Smith, a razor maker in Stannington. Joseph was granted his Freedom in 1810. He first appeared in a Sheffield directory in 1833, trading from Radford Street. By 1852, the enterprise became "& Sons" - presumably with the addition of Joseph's son John. The enterprise employed ten men and three boys. By the late 1870s, it had moved to Solly Street. The trademark was "Joseph Smith & Sons, Celebrated Razors", above "3415" (granted in 1810). By 1887, the name and mark had been acquired by Joseph Allen & Sons.

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    considering the age of the razor does anyone think the initials J J have any significance? You may if you knew what else came in the trunk.

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    It was fairly common for someone to add initials to one's razors, particularily if the owner used a common bath house. I've also read where barbers would keep customers razors in their shop and use the razor only when the customer came in for a shave. The barber would keep the razor honed and stropped and the customer got a good, disease free shave without the bother at home.

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