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Thread: 1 3/4" Method

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    Default 1 3/4" Method

    Hi All... Got my first strop and blade yesterday. I would like some help with the stroke on a 1 3/4" vs. a straight pass on a 3"+. Is it similar to a pass on a hone (except for direction of spine)? Just seems as though that extra inch or so would make it more of a easier/ natural stroke as you get complete coverage with the 3+" strop.
    Thanks!

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    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
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    An X stroke is an X stroke the only real difference is the direction of travel...

    The really simple way of thinking about stropping and honing is this "Every little bit of the edge has to pass over the hone or the strop to accomplish the process you are doing" Just so long as that happens, yer fine...

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    what Dad calls me nun2sharp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gssixgun View Post
    An X stroke is an X stroke the only real difference is the direction of travel...

    The really simple way of thinking about stropping and honing is this "Every little bit of the edge has to pass over the hone or the strop to accomplish the process you are doing" Just so long as that happens, yer fine...

    'nuff said!
    It is easier to fool people than to convince them they have been fooled. Twain

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    Senior Member xChris's Avatar
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    Make sure you keep the strop tight, and minimum pressure -- enough to keep the blade's edge & spine in contact. This will help prevent the strop from twisting over -- potentially ruining your edge or nicking the strop.
    Last edited by xChris; 12-26-2008 at 09:14 PM.

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    I did a couple X strokes slow and very light. It just seemed like another axis I need watch. Am I overthinking wanting the whole blade to be in contact and have full support of the strop? Being in full Newb mode I guess my question is should I exchange for one thats 3"+. I'm in love with this blade and dont want to jack it up.
    Damn I love this sport!
    Thanks for all the replys

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    Senior Member Tony Miller's Avatar
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    For much of strop history a 1 1/2" to 2" strop was all their was. The 2 1/2" seemed to be the american norm for years but over the past 5 or 6 years it seems it is 3" or nothing. My 3" models sell far faster than the 2 1/2' models but it seems there are those old school guys like me that prefer a narrower one. My favorite is still the 2 1/2".

    Tony Miller

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willbeblood View Post
    I did a couple X strokes slow and very light. It just seemed like another axis I need watch. Am I overthinking wanting the whole blade to be in contact and have full support of the strop? Being in full Newb mode I guess my question is should I exchange for one thats 3"+. I'm in love with this blade and dont want to jack it up.
    Damn I love this sport!
    Thanks for all the replys
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Miller View Post
    For much of strop history a 1 1/2" to 2" strop was all their was. The 2 1/2" seemed to be the american norm for years but over the past 5 or 6 years it seems it is 3" or nothing. My 3" models sell far faster than the 2 1/2' models but it seems there are those old school guys like me that prefer a narrower one. My favorite is still the 2 1/2".

    Tony Miller
    Willbeblood,

    One thing the narrow strop does is force you to perfect your X stroke -- you have to in order to cover the entire edge. Another benefit is that you have less leather to potentially curl or warp in shape, and causing problems with contact.

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    I saw that coming, the technique. You're right. Honing is the next science project and agreed that I need to get the X down.
    Thanks Chris...

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    Senior Member jwoods's Avatar
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    you need to practice stropping a lot take it slow and dont go too fast or you will wreck your strop and the edge of your razor, a razor shouldnt need to be honed but a few times a year at most, as long as you are stropping properly

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to jwoods For This Useful Post:

    Willbeblood (12-27-2008)

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    I just got done stroping and you're right I had to make it a point to slow down and lighten up on the pressure. It felt like a good rhythem though finally.
    Can I "Over-strop"?
    I was kind of fun like sharping a knife and some well deserved alone time.

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