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Thread: "New" old strop

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Default "New" old strop

    So I browsed the forums for restoring old strops. I bought this Brandt automatic stropper and I want to fix it up for possible use.

    Saddle soap and neatsfoot oil is the recommended method for restoring strop, but does it matter how old the leather is? The Brandt stropper was originally marketed in 1911, making it around 100 years old.

    Leather has a gray tint to it but no cracks or tears. looks like it hasn't been used in quite a while. The leather didn't want to bend around the top as it's supposed to so I took the mechanism apart so that I could look at the leather better. The leather is not flat on the inside, it has shallow grooves running diagonally across it. I may end up replacing the leather but thought Id give it a shot to restore it first.

    Anything special I need to do with something this old? Appreciate any feedback. Picture is from the auction until I get my camera up.

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  2. #2
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    I have had good luck with Ballistol. Clean well with saddle soap and mist Ballistol lightly on both sides with a small pump mister from a craft store, while the leather is damp.

    The water allows the Ballistol to penetrate the leather. Let it dry a day or so rewet the leather on both sides with a damp sponge in warm clean water and wait 10-15 min to absorb and mist again. Go slow adding Ballistol to allow it to soak in.

    I have brought back some old horse hide strops that were cardboard when I received them.

    The relief marks on the back were common, to help keep the strop from cupping, I believe.

  3. #3
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    Cardboard is a good description for it. If this is the original leather, I'm surprised at how good the condition is.

    I have some obenauf leather preservative so I applied a coat last night. The leather went from grey and cardboard to closer to black and more flexable.

    How many coats of oil should be applied in general? I know I don't want to be oiling my blade when I strop it just want to make sure it is as restored as possible.

    Good idea on the relief marks. If that's what they ate for it did a great job. The leather is perfectly straight side to side. Just the bend at the top where is sat for so long.

  4. #4
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    Most probably several, light misting coat on damp leather work best. If you end up with too much wrapping with paper towels with some weight works well for wicking off.

    I mist once a day and look and feel it, you will know when you have enough or too much, indirect sunlight heat helps, though this time of year may be a problem. You want it to absorb deep into the leather, not just clog the surface, so several light coats with time to absorb.

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