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  1. #1
    Senior Member doleeo's Avatar
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    Default Nicking Horsehide

    Well, I just received my Tony Miller Horsehide/Linen strop after a few months of using his Latigo/Cotton.

    During my use of the Latigo strop, I got maybe 2 small nicks at the handle end of it.

    However, on my 3rd practice stropping on the Horsehide, I've gotten 2 little nicks in around the same place. Is horsehide just easier to nick? I'm pretty sure my stropping is consistent and needless to say I'm a little peeved. I've got to say, the draw during stropping is butter smooth. I'm excited to see how the edge feels after this strop.


    Is a pumice stone safe to use on horsehide?
    Last edited by doleeo; 12-14-2009 at 09:18 PM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by doleeo View Post
    Well, I just received my Tony Miller Horsehide/Linen strop after a few months of using his Latigo/Cotton.

    During my use of the Latigo strop, I got maybe 2 small nicks at the handle end of it.

    However, on my 3rd practice stropping on the Horsehide, I've gotten 2 little nicks in around the same place. Is horsehide just easier to nick? I'm pretty sure my stropping is consistent and needless to say I'm a little peeved. I've got to say, the draw during stropping is butter smooth. I'm excited to see how the edge feels after this strop.


    Is a pumice stone safe to use on horsehide?
    Ditto. Been using TM latigo for a couple years, just got a horsehide, nicked it twice (though I was experimenting with a different stroke). No, not easier to nick. Just easier to f up when you are playing with a new toy. I love this thing. My TM latigo and TM horsehide are my two favorite shaving toys.

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    Tony Miller (12-14-2009)

  4. #3
    Senior Member doleeo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by loueedacat View Post
    Ditto. Been using TM latigo for a couple years, just got a horsehide, nicked it twice (though I was experimenting with a different stroke). No, not easier to nick. Just easier to f up when you are playing with a new toy. I love this thing. My TM latigo and TM horsehide are my two favorite shaving toys.
    I too will admit that my Tony Miller strops are my favorite thing in my bathroom. The craftsmanship is just superb.

    I guess it may just be that my Latigo is 3'' and my Horsehide is 2 1/2''. Trying to get used to that X pattern.

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    Tony Miller (12-14-2009)

  6. #4
    Forum mogwai thebigspendur's Avatar
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    It's not the type of leather that makes you nick the strop more or less its the way you strop. Maybe a wider strop or different handhold? Who knows.
    Every day without fail one should consider himself as dead-Tsunetomo

  7. #5
    Filarmonica Fanboy FatboySlim's Avatar
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    Interesting. I have a TM 2" horsehide which I love. At this point, I think I've nicked it more than my other strops combined. Actually, "nicked" is way too kind - usually, cut is more accurate. Deeply. Cleanly.

    For me, the TM 2" horsehide is like a Japanese sport bike. It's the fastest strop I own, so I tend to take chances on it speed-wise that I don't with my other strops. It has D-rings, combined with the thickness and the 2" width lets me hold it super-taut without cupping, and really rev up the strokes. That horse smokes.

    So for me, I think the raw slick speed of it tends to inspire me go faster than I should, which sometimes brings out bad technique that might otherwise be restrained or caught on a strop with more draw. But I just love that horsehide, especially in the 2" width. I just shrug, glue, buff it out, and keep on going.

    The other side of that *same* strop is 2" Latigo with terrific draw, which I also love. Barely a nick in it.

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  9. #6
    Senior Member doleeo's Avatar
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    Tim,

    Just for future reference (not saying there's a cut in my new TM Horsehide...) What kind of glue do you use and how do you buff it? I've read that rubber cement and a pumice work.

  10. #7
    Filarmonica Fanboy FatboySlim's Avatar
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    I use Krazy Glue. One variation of it comes in a little bottle that has a brush applicator, which is perfect for wedging into a sliced strop, using just enough glue to hold without too much mess. I weight it down with one of my honing stones until it dries completely, about 10 minutes to an hour.

    Lots of people use pumice stones (not the artificial junk stones at the drug store, but natural pumice, which is much finer). Myself, depending on how bad the cut is, I use either 300 grit or 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper. I always finish with 600 grit sandpaper. Good as new.

    Does it look pretty? No. Does it have character, and bear your personal mark? Yes. Over time with hand rubbing, it blends fairly nicely.

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    d. m. ellington (12-19-2009)

  12. #8
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
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    If you are nicking your strop you may still have some momentum happening in the prior direction after flipping over the spine. If you do not flip over the spine then it may be a hesitation cut when you stop.

    You can also use diamond plates to repair nicks .
    Those in the room who believe in telekinesis, raise my hand.

  13. #9
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    I too have nicked my horsehide strop a few times. I think it definitely has something to do with the speed of the draw. Being that its so smooth without great technique you can still get some speed going and nick your beautiful new strop. Or so I've heard

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    [QUOTE=doleeo;506930] I'm pretty sure my stropping is consistent QUOTE]

    Sounds really consistent to me, 2 nicks on old strop and 2 nicks on new strop.

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