Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    vnc
    vnc is offline
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    18
    Thanked: 0

    Default ...paint on a strop?

    Hi,

    Now that I know what side of my strop to use (!!), I realize that for a while now there has been _paint_ on it. I can feel it with my finger, so I guess it's liable to ruin the edge of my razor. I'd like to get rid of it. It's a 3" strop, so I can try to go around the paint, but it seems risky.

    Does anyone have an idea of a way to try to remove the paint without breaking the leather (which would most likely have the same effect on the razor I suppose)? Or should I try to cut it to 2"? Or any other idea? I'm trying to justify not buying one of Tony Miller's nice 3" strops, since this one ought to be sufficient for my needs, and I've already spent a sizable amount on honing material to fix my stropping on the wrong side (!).

    Thanks,
    --Vincent

  2. #2
    < Banned Scammer >
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sunny California!
    Posts
    466
    Thanked: 125

    Default

    Dont cut it! And dont apply any chemical to it either. Take some pics if possible, and we may be able to make some better suggestions... You may be able to just pick it off with your fingernail if it is a small spot.

  3. #3
    Scale Maniac BKratchmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Decorah, IA
    Posts
    2,671
    Thanked: 641

    Default

    I believe you could sand it off, gently, then use higher and higher grits of paper on the leather beneath it to restore the leather surface...then a little neatsfoot oil. You have to use quality sandpaper and be very gentle so that you don't embed grit in the leather...

    I'm sure Tony or Neil or someone who knows more about strops than I can give you a better answer...


    (But the little voice whispers... "Buy a TM, you know you waaaaannnt tooooo")

  4. #4
    vnc
    vnc is offline
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    18
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Don't worry, I'm not running around with a knife to cut the strop :-) I can go slow and avoid the paint for the time being. I just realized I can in fact send pictures using the webcam (hence the low quality):





    The part higher up that's really on the side doesn't worry me too much, but the rest is more problematic. Will await advice before I take any action. And I do in fact have very fine sandpaper coming my way within a week or so, so this might be a workable solution.

    --Vincent
    edit: I am unable to remove the paint using my fingernails. Since I thought this was the backside (!) I hadn't noticed the paint, so most likely it has been there for a while now. Like, 2-3 years.
    Last edited by vnc; 01-22-2010 at 09:41 PM.

  5. #5
    Master of insanity Scipio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,643
    Thanked: 495

    Default

    Try turps? You know white spirit? VERY gently on a small area first. Then wash it off, then let the strop dry. Then recondition with neatsfoot oil. LITERALLY rub 2 single drops in your hands, and rub your hands on the strop.

    Should be fine.

  6. #6
    Senior Member blabbermouth niftyshaving's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,048
    Thanked: 819

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vnc View Post
    Hi,

    Now that I know what side of my strop to use (!!), I realize that for a while now there has been _paint_ on it. I can feel it with my finger, so I guess it's liable to ruin the edge of my razor. I'd like to get rid of it. It's a 3" strop, so I can try to go around the paint, but it seems risky.

    Does anyone have an idea of a way to try to remove the paint
    .........
    What type of paint is it and is it fully dry and hard?

    Solvents are hard to select unless you know what paint it is.
    I am tempted to say just scrap it off with the back of a butter knife.

    If you have a fine drugstore nail file you could sand it off.

    The good news is most paint pigment is soft and fine as heck.
    Once you get it down flat it might not cause any trouble.

  7. #7
    Senior Member blabbermouth niftyshaving's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,048
    Thanked: 819

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scipio View Post
    Try turps? You know white spirit? VERY gently on a small area first. Then wash it off, then let the strop dry. Then recondition with neatsfoot oil. LITERALLY rub 2 single drops in your hands, and rub your hands on the strop.

    Should be fine.
    +1 on the drops of neatsfoot oil. Just enough to make your hand
    feel oily but not enough to see on the strop. If I was still 18
    rubbing my forehead would gather more than enough oil.

    We/ I forgot to ask what shape the reverse of the strop is in.
    Some people like the flip side of some strops.
    Last edited by niftyshaving; 01-22-2010 at 10:49 PM. Reason: Check the flip side.

  8. #8
    vnc
    vnc is offline
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    18
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by niftyshaving View Post
    +1 on the drops of neatsfoot oil. Just enough to make your hand
    feel oily but not enough to see on the strop. If I was still 18
    rubbing my forehead would gather more than enough oil.

    We/ I forgot to ask what shape the reverse of the strop is in.
    Some people like the flip side of some strops.
    The reverse side is slightly bumpy leather. For now I'm blaming my sharpness problems with my stropping on the "wrong side" for so long.

    I don't know where this paint comes from, nor do I have any idea what type it is. Unfortunately. It is fully hard and dry. Most likely has been for a few years (2-3). I'll try to sand it off and condition as you suggested.

    Thanks,
    --Vincent

  9. #9
    Senior Member sffone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Baton Rouge, La.
    Posts
    357
    Thanked: 93

    Default

    You can also use a pumice stone to sand your strop. But whether you use pumice stone or sandpaper, finish up with a real fine sandpaper and you'll be OK. I would sand the strop before I'd try using any kind of solvent. A solvent might likely carry pigment further into the leather. Sanding, on the other hand, might get rid of any discoloration as well as the paint itself. Good luck.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •