Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5
    Thanked: 0

    Default "Proper" Width of a Strop?

    I bought a strip of leather from a leather worker, and I got it cut 4" Wide, 36" long. In retrospect, I should have done some more research, and gotten a more useful size.

    Either way, I was going to make the strop 4 inches wide, so that I don't have to worry about an "X" Pattern. Although, it seems like all other strops are approximately 2 1/2, 3 inches?

    I'm just wondering if there's any benefit to making a strop thinner as opposed to wider (Or what width would you specifically suggest?)

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Central new jersey, USA
    Posts
    729
    Thanked: 240

    Default

    Most razors are 3" or less so this is usually the max thickness that strops come in. You are right in that by using a wider strop you won't have to use an X stroke which is the appeal of a 3" strop but 4" is really too large as there is no added benefit to the extra width and you potentially have a greater risk of the strop cupping. I've seen other strops as narrow a 2" which requires a fairly sever X stroke but I believe a 2.5" is historically the width of choice. Thinner has less of a potential to cup while also being the most economical other than that I can't see any reason for a thinner strop.
    Last edited by thehekler; 03-16-2011 at 10:41 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Legion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Aussie, Aussie, Aussie!
    Posts
    312
    Thanked: 89

    Default

    I personally believe that there is a lot of benefit in doing some X stroke during stropping. The strops I make are 2.5" wide, and I believe that is the optimal width, not being too narrow, but still allowing for some X during the stroke. it also reduces the chances of cupping, etc, which can happen more easily on the wider strops.

    Historically strops were generally narrower, usually closer to the 2" mark. The 3" strop is a fairly new invention.
    Last edited by Legion; 03-17-2011 at 02:52 AM.

  4. #4
    Forum mogwai thebigspendur's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    27,513
    Thanked: 4361
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    The wider the strop the more chance for cupping. X strokes are always good. It's better to learn the right way and not use a wide strop as a crutch. Some do prefer wider and that's fine but one you learn to do it the classic way the width does not matter.
    Every day without fail one should consider himself as dead-Tsunetomo

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Alright, thanks for the advice. I'll make it 2.5", I'll post some pictures as soon as it's done.

  6. #6
    Member AFDavis11's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,735
    Thanked: 1479

    Default

    Wow, that only took five or six years to finally come to maturity. I bet there are hundreds of 3 inch wide hones and 3 inch wide strops in the world just so people can "avoid" an x pattern.

    Nelson, you hit that one on the head.

    I like both sizes, but that is a damn good point. Jeez, I really yearn for a Sr. Member forum.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5
    Thanked: 0

    Default

    Here's the strop I made. Not bad for 2 hours work. Really wish I had gotten the rivets a bit better spaced, but it's not so bad.




    I decided to loop through a rawhide shoelace for a handle to hold while you're stropping, but I wonder if over time it will cause the strop to cup? The leather is really quite stiff.




    Lastly, the leather isn't perfectly straight, in fact there are minor hills and valleys that dont go away when taut. I used my practice razor on it, and you can hear it making different sounds as it rolls over some of the hills. What's the best way to make it as flat as I can make it?

    Here's a (poor) picture of the shape of the leather.




    So to sum up then, do you think the shoelace would cause cupping? And what's the best way to really flatten out my leather, without buying an oil or treatment?

    EDIT: If the flanges look kind of loose or shabby, I havent tightened the chicago screws all the way, so they arent really clamped down yet.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Legion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Aussie, Aussie, Aussie!
    Posts
    312
    Thanked: 89

    Default

    Personally I would use that metal part you have at the top as a handle and get a D or a triangle shaped piece for the top. I can see that lace causing problems over time.

  9. #9
    Senior Member BanjoTom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Fort Lauderdale
    Posts
    599
    Thanked: 133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thehekler View Post
    You potentially have a greater risk of the strop cupping
    +1 I had to learn this as well. My 3" wide strop cupps while my 6.6 cm does not. So many times men on this site have suggested the importance of learning how to strop and hone with an "X" stroke. Their suggestion is invaluable. It has taken me some time to appreciate it.

  10. #10
    May your bone always be well buried MickR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Brisbane/Redcliffe, Australia
    Posts
    6,415
    Thanked: 970

    Default

    Since you've used chicago screws (smart man) I would suggest that you replace the rawhide lace for Dee rings at both ends and re-attach your lace to one of those. While you have it in bits I would also suggest approaching a leather worker or Saddlers shop to see if they have what is called a 'leather splitter' on hand. Running the leather through the splitter and removing some of the flesh side of the leather will give the strop an even thickness and may fix those hills and valleys for you.
    Apart from that I would suggest appling some leather treatment and running the leather over a smooth 90 degree angle or a glass bottle to help with that bumpy-ness.
    Good luck, and next strop measure and mark where the rivet holes are going to go before punching them out.


    Mick

    Should have paid more attention to the photo's. Legion suggested that metal part as a handle, I'll back him up on that suggestion and just get something like a Dee for the other end.
    Last edited by MickR; 03-18-2011 at 12:41 PM. Reason: P.S

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •