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Thread: Handsanding howto

  1. #21
    Beaker bevansmw's Avatar
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    I've been using WD-40 since I read in another post where gsixxsgun recommended it, with the wet/dry norton sandpaper. Was a little hard to find all of the grits, but I got them all at once the other day from a woodcraft.
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  3. #22
    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    Actually, WD-40 is an interesting idea.

    I don't use water because that is very risky at lower grits.

    With 240 or even 400 - 600 grit, you leave significant scratch lines that will grab water. If you leve the blade exposed to air even a very short time, it will start to rust under your very nose.

    I once used a small wet grinder to experiment with, and even though I was continuously working the blade, it had oxidized patches when I was done. The oxidation ran deep in the scratch lines, and took a lot of extra sanding to get out.

    I'll give WD-40 a try, but I normally use my sandpaper dry.
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    Senior Member CRuzin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    With 240 or even 400 - 600 grit, you leave significant scratch lines that will grab water. If you leve the blade exposed to air even a very short time, it will start to rust under your very nose.
    That happened to me the other night. I had just finished wet sanding with 220 grit. I got out some 400, and by the time I had cut a strip for my hand sander, the blade had fine rust all over it! It's amazing how fast rust can form.

  5. #24
    Senior Member Sancho's Avatar
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    I've been using mineral oil to wet sand and am very happy with the results.
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    Well....All I've got to say is: "I sure wish I saw THIS post two months ago" ! ! !

    I've got two razors (total rust) that I'm bound & determined to restore myself.

    Now I realize my two MAJOR mistakes are:

    #1 - Using my fingers, rather than a wood block......and
    #2 - Being a little "gun-shy" on the paper....(I'm using #400)

    THANKS BRUNO !.....You've made my life easier ALREADY !

    Marko....

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  8. #26
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    I really like the WD-40, really makes sanding smoother and easier and kinda coats the blade so it wont rust when you turn your back.

  9. #27
    The Great & Powerful Oz onimaru55's Avatar
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    WD-40 is great for sanding but if you prefer water or are allergic to petrochemicals a little bicarb soda in the water will prevent rust. It is used by Japanese sword polishers.
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  11. #28
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    Hi...

    I am new here.. and I only have 1 month of "straight" shaving under my belt. Both myself and my father have done some of this work on ebay razors and I wine corks have proven very useful tools indeed. I am also a great fan of 0000 wire wool... it is great for burnishing, especially with a bit of compound on it.

    I have also found that grapeseed oil is a suburb lubricant for this type of job. It is pretty much odourless, will not rust the blade and stops the paper clogging.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tris_d View Post
    ... grapeseed oil is a suburb lubricant for this type of job...
    The problem is you have to commute a ways to get the stuff and it smells like soccer moms.

    Sorry tris_d. Sometimes I can't help myself. Well, actually most of the time...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iron_Beard View Post
    The problem is you have to commute a ways to get the stuff and it smells like soccer moms.

    Sorry tris_d. Sometimes I can't help myself. Well, actually most of the time...
    LOL...

    I get grapeseed from ASDA (English supermarket run by Wallmart) it is with all the other cooking oils. The real key is to soak your paper in what ever you are using for at least an hour. It cuts much better and will last a lot lot longer. It is surprising how much wet sanding you can do with just one sheet before it is worn out.

    I actually stumbled into it as we had to get some to take my 5 month old son to baby massage. It is very lubricating and I have even been using it as a shaving oil for my third pass with great results.

    It is like the green paste. Chromium Dioxide is a widely used artists pigment and you can get a significant amount of it for not much cash in comparison to buying a tiny tubr of paste. Now if I could find out what else is in the paste....

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