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  1. #1
    Senior Member floppyshoes's Avatar
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    Cool Nail Polish Remover - 1001 uses

    Acetone, commonly called Nail Polish Remover, has many uses around the shop. Here are some of them related to straight razor restoration.


    Plastic Scale Refinishing - I'm sure we all have a razor with plastic scales that have some small scratches, scuffs, stains etc. Take a rag and make a tight nub out of a part of it about the size of a golf ball. Apply some acetone to this then immediately rub it vigorously on the scales. Don't stop moving and make quick circular movements. This will disolve a thin layer of the plastic and redistribute it evenly. When you're done, put the scales down to dry a minute, then buff lightly with a clean rag.

    Plastic Welding - You can fuse most plastics using acetone. Just apply a drop to one of the surfaces and hold the other surface in place until it dries. There are other, better chemicals for this (methylene chloride comes to mind) but acetone works in a pinch. A drop of acetone on a crack in your scales is also a great way to stabilize it (prevent it from getting worse or separating)

    Blade Sanitizing - Acetone is a very effective disinfectant and is a drying agent.

    Permanent Marker Remover - Acetone will disolve permanent marker ink very effectively. Use it to clean your blades after using a marker to check your bevel when honing, or on your shirt when you accidentally mark it.

    Super Glue Solvent - Glue yourself to your bench? Reach for the acetone. Apply, let it soak and gently pry the surfaces apart, applying more if needed.



    Anybody got other uses?

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    Senior Member tjiscooler's Avatar
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    Question hmm

    Does the rubbing scales work on celluliod? I have a Genco thats scratched and was thinking of doing that but will it work and not damage the scales?

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    Senior Member floppyshoes's Avatar
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    Acetone works on celluloid.
    You won't damage the scales if you keep the cloth moving (i.e. never let it rest in one place). The trick is to make a tight ball so that what contacts the scales is mostly the cloth and not liquid acetone. Use fast light strokes. If the end finish is not as glossy as you'd like, you can finish with a polishing compound or simply a clean rag and some elbow grease.

    Admittedly this technique is not for beginners. If you have some old scales to practice on that might be a good idea.

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    So you're saying that if by chance I won a new Robeson shur-edge with a nice hammered tang on ebay and upon receiving it, immediately snapped one of the celluloid scales in half cleaning the inside of it (and I'm not saying I did...this is just hypothetical you understand), that I would be able to fuse the two halves back together with acetone and it would be as strong as it was before?

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    Senior Member floppyshoes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cstewart View Post
    So you're saying that if by chance I won a new Robeson shur-edge with a nice hammered tang on ebay and upon receiving it, immediately snapped one of the celluloid scales in half cleaning the inside of it (and I'm not saying I did...this is just hypothetical you understand), that I would be able to fuse the two halves back together with acetone and it would be as strong as it was before?
    Yes, you can fuse it
    No it won't be as strong as before, but it'll be pretty sturdy. You can also expect some physical distortion around the weld. I would recommend Methylene Chloride for this, not acetone. It works faster and causes less distortion.

    IMHO you'd get better results installing a liner if you want to keep the original scales (or have someone install one for you). The welding method I put forth is more applicable to other types of work.

    EDIT: I just tried it to make sure I wasn't talking out of another hole... I repared a scrap scale I purposely snapped. The repair is solid, but when bent again it breaks on the same line. It took a decent force before failing. I applied the acetone with a small paint brush to both sides and held them in place for a minute or 2. Making sure you don't spill any on the other parts of the scales is important since it will soften and possibly distort any plastic/celluloid it touches. I was using 99% acetone, if you use nail polish remover check the concentration. It will take longer to set (dry?) at lower concentrations.
    Last edited by floppyshoes; 05-14-2008 at 02:03 PM.

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    Senior Member tjiscooler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by floppyshoes View Post
    Acetone works on celluloid.
    You won't damage the scales if you keep the cloth moving (i.e. never let it rest in one place). The trick is to make a tight ball so that what contacts the scales is mostly the cloth and not liquid acetone. Use fast light strokes. If the end finish is not as glossy as you'd like, you can finish with a polishing compound or simply a clean rag and some elbow grease.

    Admittedly this technique is not for beginners. If you have some old scales to practice on that might be a good idea.
    thanks ill try that! I was thinking of using MAAS on them, but then I realized I have not found any yet...

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    Material Data Safety Sheet (MSDS): Acetone

    Note: This information sheet has been re-formatted for better clarity by the Department of Earth Sciences. Some of the data such as information on shipping and weapons treaties were intentionally left out. If you want to look at the complete MSDS, you can either check one of the hardcopy versions in the Department, contact the manufacturer, or check one of the various Web-based databases such as those compiled by BU's Office of Environmental Health & Safety
    1. Product Identification

    ACETONE

    MSDS Number: A0446 --- Effective Date: 04/09/98
    Synonyms: Dimethylketone; 2-propanone; dimethylketal
    CAS No.: 67-64-1
    Molecular Weight: 58.08
    Chemical Formula: (CH3)2CO

    2. Composition/Information on Ingredients



    Ingredient

    CAS #

    Percent

    Hazardous?

    Acetone
    67-64-1
    99-100%Yes
    3. Hazards Identification

    Emergency Overview
    --------------------------
    DANGER! EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE LIQUID AND VAPOR. VAPOR MAY CAUSE
    FLASH FIRE. HARMFUL IF SWALLOWED OR INHALED. CAUSES IRRITATION
    TO SKIN, EYES AND RESPIRATORY TRACT. AFFECTS CENTRAL NERVOUS
    SYSTEM.
    J.T. Baker SAF-T-DATA(tm) Ratings (Provided here for your convenience)
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Health Rating: 1 - Slight
    Flammability Rating: 4 - Extreme (Flammable)
    Reactivity Rating: 2 - Moderate
    Contact Rating: 1 - Slight
    Lab Protective Equip: GOGGLES; LAB COAT; VENT HOOD; PROPER GLOVES; CLASS B
    EXTINGUISHER
    Storage Color Code: Red (Flammable)
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Potential Health Effects
    ----------------------------------
    Inhalation:
    Inhalation of vapors irritates the respiratory tract. May cause coughing, dizziness, dullness, and headache. Higher concentrations can produce central nervous system depression, narcosis, and unconsciousness.
    Ingestion:
    Swallowing small amounts is not likely to produce harmful effects. Ingestion of larger amounts may produce abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Aspiration into lungs can produce severe lung damage and is a medical emergency. Other symptoms are expected to parallel inhalation.
    Skin Contact:
    Irritating due to defatting action on skin. Causes redness, pain, drying and cracking of the skin.
    Eye Contact:
    Vapors are irritating to the eyes. Splashes may cause severe irritation, with stinging, tearing, redness and pain.
    Chronic Exposure:
    Prolonged or repeated skin contact may produce severe irritation or dermatitis.
    Aggravation of Pre-existing Conditions:
    Use of alcoholic beverages enhances toxic effects. Exposure may increase the toxic potential of chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as chloroform, trichloroethane. 4. First Aid Measures

    Inhalation:
    Remove to fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. Get medical attention.
    Ingestion:
    Aspiration hazard. If swallowed, vomiting may occur spontaneously, but DO NOT INDUCE. If vomiting occurs, keep head below hips to prevent aspiration into lungs. Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Call a physician immediately.
    Skin Contact:
    Immediately flush skin with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes. Remove contaminated clothing and shoes. Get medical attention. Wash clothing before reuse. Thoroughly clean shoes before reuse.
    Eye Contact:
    Immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes, lifting upper and lower eyelids occasionally. Get medical attention. 5. Fire Fighting Measures

    Fire:
    Flash point: -20C (-4F) CC
    Autoignition temperature: 465C (869F)
    Flammable limits in air % by volume: lel: 2.5; uel: 12.8
    Extremely Flammable Liquid and Vapor! Vapor may cause flash fire.
    Explosion:
    Above flash point, vapor-air mixtures are explosive within flammable limits noted above. Vapors can
    flow along surfaces to distant ignition source and flash back. Contact with strong oxidizers may cause
    fire. Sealed containers may rupture when heated. This material may produce a floating fire hazard.
    Sensitive to static discharge. Fire Extinguishing Media:
    Dry chemical, alcohol foam or carbon dioxide. Water may be ineffective. Water spray may be used to
    keep fire exposed containers cool, dilute spills to nonflammable mixtures, protect personnel attempting to
    stop leak and disperse vapors.
    Special Information:
    In the event of a fire, wear full protective clothing and NIOSH-approved self-contained breathing
    apparatus with full facepiece operated in the pressure demand or other positive pressure mode. 6. Accidental Release Measures

    Ventilate area of leak or spill. Remove all sources of ignition. Wear appropriate personal protective
    equipment as specified in Section 8. Isolate hazard area. Keep unnecessary and unprotected personnel
    from entering. Contain and recover liquid when possible. Use non-sparking tools and equipment. Collect
    liquid in an appropriate container or absorb with an inert material (e. g., vermiculite, dry sand, earth), and
    place in a chemical waste container. Do not use combustible materials, such as saw dust. Do not flush to
    sewer! If a leak or spill has not ignited, use water spray to disperse the vapors, to protect personnel
    attempting to stop leak, and to flush spills away from exposures. US Regulations (CERCLA) require
    reporting spills and releases to soil, water and air in excess of reportable quantities. The toll free number
    for the US Coast Guard National Response Center is (800) 424-8802.
    J. T. Baker SOLUSORB(tm) solvent adsorbent is recommended for spills of this product.
    7. Handling and Storage

    Protect against physical damage. Store in a cool, dry well-ventilated location, away from any area where
    the fire hazard may be acute. Outside or detached storage is preferred. Separate from incompatibles.
    Containers should be bonded and grounded for transfers to avoid static sparks. Storage and use areas
    should be No Smoking areas. Use non-sparking type tools and equipment, including explosion proof
    ventilation. Containers of this material may be hazardous when empty since they retain product residues
    (vapors, liquid); observe all warnings and precautions listed for the product.
    8. Exposure Controls/Personal Protection

    Airborne Exposure Limits:
    -OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL): 1000 ppm (TWA)
    -ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV): 500 ppm (TWA), 750 ppm (STEL) A4 - not classifiable as a human carcinogen
    Ventilation System:
    A system of local and/or general exhaust is recommended to keep employee exposures below the
    Airborne Exposure Limits. Local exhaust ventilation is generally preferred because it can control the
    emissions of the contaminant at its source, preventing dispersion of it into the general work area. Please
    refer to the ACGIH document, Industrial Ventilation, A Manual of Recommended Practices, most recent
    edition, for details.
    Personal Respirators (NIOSH Approved):
    If the exposure limit is exceeded, a half-face organic vapor respirator may be worn for up to ten times the
    exposure limit or the maximum use concentration specified by the appropriate regulatory agency or
    respirator supplier, whichever is lowest. A full-face piece organic vapor respirator may be worn up to 50
    times the exposure limit or the maximum use concentration specified by the appropriate regulatory agency
    or respirator supplier, whichever is lowest. For emergencies or instances where the exposure levels are
    not known, use a full-face piece positive-pressure, air-supplied respirator. WARNING: Air-purifying
    respirators do not protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
    Skin Protection:
    Wear impervious protective clothing, including boots, gloves, lab coat, apron or coveralls, as
    appropriate, to prevent skin contact.
    Eye Protection:
    Use chemical safety goggles and/or a full face shield where splashing is possible. Maintain eye wash
    fountain and quick-drench facilities in work area.
    9. Physical and Chemical Properties (Acetone)

    Appearance:Clear, colorless, volatile liquid.Odor:Fragrant, mint-likeSolubility:Miscible in all proportions in water.Density:0.79 @ 20C/4CpH:No information found.% Volatiles by volume @ 21C (70F):100%Boiling Point:56.5C (133F) @ 760 mm HgMelting Point:-95C (-139F)Vapor Density (Air=1):2.0Vapor Pressure (mm Hg):400 @ 39.5C (104F)Evaporation Rate (n-Butyl Acetate=1):7.7
    10. Stability and Reactivity

    Stability:
    Stable under ordinary conditions of use and storage.
    Hazardous Decomposition Products:
    Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may form when heated to decomposition.
    Hazardous Polymerization:
    Will not occur.
    Incompatibilities:
    Concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixtures, oxidizing materials, chloroform, alkalis, chlorine
    compounds, acids, potassium t-butoxide.
    Conditions to Avoid:
    Heat, flames, ignition sources and incompatibles.
    11. Toxicological Information

    Oral rat LD50: 5800 mg/kg; Inhalation rat LC50: 50,100mg/m3; Irritation eye rabbit, Standard Draize, 20
    mg severe; investigated as a tumorigen, mutagen, reproductive effector.
    NTP Carcinogen

    Ingredient

    Known

    Anticipated

    IARC Category

    Acetone (67-64-1)
    No
    NoNone
    12. Ecological Information

    Environmental Fate:
    When released into the soil, this material is expected to readily biodegrade. When released into the soil,
    this material is expected to leach into groundwater. When released into the soil, this material is expected to
    quickly evaporate. When released into water, this material is expected to readily biodegrade. When
    released to water, this material is expected to quickly evaporate. This material has a log octanol-water
    partition coefficient of less than 3.0. This material is not expected to significantly bioaccumulate. When
    released into the air, this material may be moderately degraded by reaction with photochemically produced
    hydroxyl radicals. When released into the air, this material may be moderately degraded by photolysis.
    When released into the air, this material is expected to be readily removed from the atmosphere by wet
    deposition.
    Environmental Toxicity:
    This material is not expected to be toxic to aquatic life. The LC50/96-hour values for fish are over 100
    mg/l.
    13. Disposal Considerations

    Whatever cannot be saved for recovery or recycling should be handled as hazardous waste and sent to a
    RCRA approved incinerator or disposed in a RCRA approved waste facility. Processing, use or
    contamination of this product may change the waste management options. State and local disposal
    regulations may differ from federal disposal regulations. Dispose of container and unused contents in
    accordance with federal, state and local requirements.
    16. Other Information

    NFPA Ratings: Health: 1 Flammability: 3 Reactivity: 0
    Label Hazard Warning:
    DANGER! EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE LIQUID AND VAPOR. VAPOR MAY CAUSE FLASH
    FIRE. HARMFUL IF SWALLOWED OR INHALED. CAUSES IRRITATION TO SKIN, EYES AND
    RESPIRATORY TRACT. AFFECTS CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
    Label Precautions:
    Keep away from heat, sparks and flame.
    Keep container closed.
    Use only with adequate ventilation.
    Wash thoroughly after handling.
    Avoid breathing vapor.
    Avoid contact with eyes, skin and clothing.
    Label First Aid:
    Aspiration hazard. If swallowed, vomiting may occur spontaneously, but DO NOT INDUCE. If vomiting
    occurs, keep head below hips to prevent aspiration into lungs. Never give anything by mouth to an
    unconscious person. Call a physician immediately. If inhaled, remove to fresh air. If not breathing, give
    artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes or
    skin with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes. Remove contaminated clothing and shoes. Wash
    clothing before reuse. In all cases, get medical attention.
    Product Use:
    Laboratory Reagent.
    Revision Information:
    MSDS Section(s) changed since last revision of document include: 8.

    Disclaimer:
    ************************************************** ****************************
    Mallinckrodt Baker, Inc. provides the information contained herein in good faith but
    makes no representation as to its comprehensiveness or accuracy. This document is
    intended only as a guide to the appropriate precautionary handling of the material by a
    properly trained person using this product. Individuals receiving the information must
    exercise their independent judgment in determining its appropriateness for a particular
    purpose. MALLINCKRODT BAKER, INC. MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR
    WARRANTIES, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT
    LIMITATION ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A
    PARTICULAR PURPOSE WITH RESPECT TO THE INFORMATION SET FORTH
    HEREIN OR THE PRODUCT TO WHICH THE INFORMATION REFERS.
    ACCORDINGLY, MALLINCKRODT BAKER, INC. WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE
    FOR DAMAGES RESULTING FROM USE OF OR RELIANCE UPON THIS
    INFORMATION.
    ************************************************** ****************************
    Prepared by: Strategic Services Division
    Phone Number: (314) 539-1600 (U.S.A.)

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  10. #8
    Senior Member floppyshoes's Avatar
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    Yeah, it's probably not a good idea to drink acetone or smoke a cigarette while working with it...

  11. #9
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    I am very big on data. I like having as much info as possible on anything I use. I don't necessarily use the data but I like having it. I have a background in optical engineering and I use acetone and isopropanol more than most people use water. I just love the stuff.

  12. #10
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    We always had to use a double layer of gloves and a gas mask to use acetone, I don't see why people would put it on their nails

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