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Thread: A few questions about greaseless compounds

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    Default A few questions about greaseless compounds

    Ive read through the stuff here, and the stuff on the Caswell site and there are a few things I'm not clear about.

    So, the sisal wheel is usually for cutting, and the spiral sewn wheel is for polishing. Which is better for the greaseless compounds? From what I can see the greaseless compounds are basically a grit with an adhesive binder, and since the sisal wheel frays I'm wondering if you'd want to use a spiral wheel since it would present a more regular surface to grind with.

    Are the medium colored compounds basically just like high grit greaseless compounds, except they are greasy? Which compounds would be a good addition to the greaseless compounds?

    What do you need to do for wheel prep, and what are the solutions they sell for the wheels (like glue-tite), also, do you need to periodically rake the greasless compounds?

    I appreciate for any info.

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    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
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    Pete I am going to give you my set up from start to finish... Mad Max, Lynn, and Floppyshoes also can jump in with their opinions....

    On the 1725 rpm buffer 80 & 120 grit Fomax compounds on sisal wheels, then 180-320-400-600 on spiral sewn wheels...

    On the 3450 rpm buffer spiral sewn wheels Dico Emory & Stainless then
    on loose polishing wheels Dico Chrome & .50 Chromium Oxide....

    4-6-8 inch wheels depending on the razor...

    Be ever mindful of heat buildup...
    seanreum1 likes this.

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    Thanks Glen, thats useful. I'll prolly just emulate your set up.

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    I use sisal for greaseless compounds and emery, spiral cotton for the rouges, stainless compound and tripoly. I also have a loose flanel buff for the green CrOx compound, but I don't use it on razors due to its tendency to grab them.

    The reason I use sisal for the greaseless compounds is that I find they don't lose their compound as fast. Since you must wait for them to dry after reapplying fresh compound, longevity is a big bonus. I also find the compound clumps less on the sisal.

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    I only use sisal for emery and spiral cotton for the rouges and greaseless. Loose cotton wheel for the last high mirror polish with cro-ox. 4 - 6 - 8 inch wheels. 1800 and 3600 rpm

    As you see there's many roads that lead to Rome and each has their own workflow. You'll end up with what works best for you in the long run.

    One thing to remember with the sisal is that it will bring excessive heat when used with rouges and if you use to much pressure it will incur deeper scratches in the steel. Excessive heat is a problem with all wheels in general.
    Max Sprecher
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    Thanks for the info, everyone.

    One thing I'd still like to know, is wheel prep or treatment and maintenance pretty much the same for the greaseless and colored compounds? I've read the info on maintaining colored compunds, but I haven't seen anything on maintaining the greaseless. I just want to make sure that when I make my order I'll have everything I'll need.

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    You will need a buff rake sooner or later using the greaseless but you are supposed to use that with polishing compounds too...

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    Pete, I personally stopped using the wheel prep. For me the greaseless adhere the same with or without. Some swear by it. I gave up on it.

    A wheel rake should be part of your buffer and wheels setup. Sooner or later you will need to rake your wheels. You'll notice when it's time to use it.

    One word of advise. If you don't want to look like some kind of chicken that just came back from cage fighting please use some kind of dust collector or shop-vac when raking your wheels. If not you'll end up looking like Santa. Cotton fibers and compounds particles everywhere! And wear a respirator. at all times
    Max Sprecher
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete_S View Post
    Thanks for the info, everyone.

    One thing I'd still like to know, is wheel prep or treatment and maintenance pretty much the same for the greaseless and colored compounds? I've read the info on maintaining colored compunds, but I haven't seen anything on maintaining the greaseless. I just want to make sure that when I make my order I'll have everything I'll need.
    One thing that some of us take for granted, but that isn't mentioned anywhere prominent, is how greaseless compounds are applied. Unlike grease-based compounds, which can be applied to the wheels any time, greaseless compounds are glue-based and must be applied ahead of time, then left to dry. If you try to use "wet" greaseless compound you'll end up losing 90% of it as soon as you start buffing.

    When you get your buffer and wheels, set up each wheel you'll be using, rake it well to fluff it up a bit, then apply your compound. In my climate (currently 85 degrees and super humid) greaseless compounds take a few hours to fully dry. Future applications may or may not require raking. As with every other craft I know, patience is paramount in buffing.

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    Dan D Man is dead on, I have been in the habit of setting up my buffs after I get done with them for the day/session.. I re-apply the compound and let them sit ready to go until my next session...
    That way when I do go out to the shop I don't have to wait around for the glue to set up....

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