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Thread: What are the most used tools for restoration....

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    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
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    Default What are the most used tools for restoration....

    I have been noticing quite a few threads about what tools are used in restoration workshops...

    Please pick your top tools by frequency of use ... I am not including hand tools like a small ball peen hammer, files, punches, wire cutters etc:

    Mine are rather easy

    Buffer: if you can only have one get a 1725 rpm or a variable speed and get a buffer not a torn down grinder the longer the arbors (arms) the better...These can also be made from an old washing machine motor...
    Watch the HP, for what we do you don't need a ton of it....This is one of the most dangerous tools we use, I tend to want a lower HP rating so if I mess up it doesn't yank my arm off...

    Vice/anvil: Invaluable in the shop a 3" to 5" works great and get one that bolts/screws to the bench...

    Drill Press: If you make scales they are a must not only for holes but you can get attachments for drum sanding that you can use for shaping and even planening...Get a variable speed one, most are

    Bench sander: My most used scale making tool is a 4x36 arm with a 5 inch disc can do so many things for so little money..

    Power saw: I have many from the rifle business but if I were going to have only one of the many, it would be a table saw with a jig to rip 1/8 - 3/16 stock... I have used all the saws to try this, so far the most exact and the smoothest cuts come from a properly set up table saw....


    Keep in mind there are tons of great tools sitting in Pawn shops and flea markets and garage sales everywhere in the country I am pretty sure this is true all over the world please correct me if I am wrong so you don't have to spend a ton of $$$$........

    If I were setting up a small shop to only make razors I would seriously look into the mini-tools by Proxxon they are crazy expensive though...


    Those are my must have tools...
    Last edited by gssixgun; 10-27-2009 at 05:54 PM.
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    I shave with a spoon on a stick. Slartibartfast's Avatar
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    Thanks Glen. I dont restore as much a lot of guys here.

    But... For me my buffer and anvil/peening hammer are my most used. I have a drill press now and the sanding drums. But I got buy without them for a long time.

    I like using flush cutters for cutting the rod too, a little less sanding to get it flat after.

    My next purchase is going to be a scroll saw or band saw for my rough cuts.

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    Senior Moderator JimmyHAD's Avatar
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    With the exception of the table saw I've got all of that stuff. I have both a 1725 rpm buffer and a 3450. I used the faster model for tattoo machine frames and the slower one for tobacco pipes.

    So I got an old Revisor off of ebay and the it was in really nice shape except that the scales were grungy. So I washed them in the sink with dish soap and they came clean as a whistle but the off white color was a bit dull.

    I thought I would try the buffer and went to the 1725 and just barely touched the scales to the soft cotton wheel. I was doing fine for the first few seconds and next thing I knew the wheel grabbed the scales and out of my hand it went.

    Fortunately for me the scales and the blade weren't damaged but it scared the pants off me. I don't know how you guys do it but I think i will leave the buffing to my dremel if I do any at all.
    Be careful how you treat people on your way up, you may meet them again on your way back down.

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    I shave with a spoon on a stick. Slartibartfast's Avatar
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    The loose cotton wheels are the ones that scare me.

    BTW, what do you do w/ the pipes on your buffer?

    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyHAD View Post
    With the exception of the table saw I've got all of that stuff. I have both a 1725 rpm buffer and a 3450. I used the faster model for tattoo machine frames and the slower one for tobacco pipes.

    So I got an old Revisor off of ebay and the it was in really nice shape except that the scales were grungy. So I washed them in the sink with dish soap and they came clean as a whistle but the off white color was a bit dull.

    I thought I would try the buffer and went to the 1725 and just barely touched the scales to the soft cotton wheel. I was doing fine for the first few seconds and next thing I knew the wheel grabbed the scales and out of my hand it went.

    Fortunately for me the scales and the blade weren't damaged but it scared the pants off me. I don't know how you guys do it but I think i will leave the buffing to my dremel if I do any at all.

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    Senior Member floppyshoes's Avatar
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    Power tools, by frequency of use, not mentioning safety equipment, dust collection etc.
    in descending order...

    1. Lathe (acting as buffer)
    2. Bench Sander (Scale making, Blade polishing)
    3. Dremel (Blade Polishing)
    4. Band Saw (resawing stock, cutting out scales)
    5. Drill Press (scales holes, making jigs)
    6. Scroll Saw (used to cut out scales when the bandsaw is loaded with the resaw blade)
    7. 3600 rpm Grinder (for rough work and quick removal of broken scales)
    8. Radio (cause having a little music in the shop is kinda nice)

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    Senior Member blabbermouth ChrisL's Avatar
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    I think Bill Ellis said that the buffer is the most dangerous tool in the shop. I agree with him. Even keeping the item being buffed below the center line when polishing and way above the center line when cutting those wheels can grab in an instant.

    I use kevlar gloves which have saved me from deep cuts and stitches more than once now. The only thing I don't like about them is that you can't feel how hot the blade is getting, but they force me to take my time rather than trying to do too much too fast.

    If I was going to be doing restoration full time and setting up a shop for that, I would focus on dust collection; someone was good in mentioning that fairly recently. Working with abrasives that are sent airborne, one would not have to be working all that long before the cumulative exposure could shut you down.

    I have a retired friend in his sixties that has a woodworking shop. He's an amateur but loves making anything from jewelry boxes to furniture in order to supplement a very small income. He has no dust collection in his small shop. Sadly it's apparent when talking to him as his breathing can be labored and he's got a bad cough.

    Chris L
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    Senior Moderator JimmyHAD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slartibartfast View Post
    The loose cotton wheels are the ones that scare me.

    BTW, what do you do w/ the pipes on your buffer?
    I bought it to take the oxidation off of the vulcanite stems. I have had up to 400 pipes at a time as I used to buy/sell/trade them. I probably have half of that now in my rotation.

    I rarely use the buffer on my pipes unless I am going to ebay one or two and then I will just clean the stem and give the wood a light polish. I hate seeing a pipe with buffed nomenclature so when I do use the buffer it is with care and a very light touch.
    Be careful how you treat people on your way up, you may meet them again on your way back down.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth Joed's Avatar
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    This is a tough one Glen. So many ways to skin a cat. I've been restoring on a budget so in starting out most all work was done by hand. I would say that my hands are the most used tools and w/o skill and coordination with your hands this craft should not be attempted with power tools. It's just not safe. On the same level is a good head on your shoulders. Use the tools you have on hand to achieve your desired results in a safe manor.

    Everything else from here is a time saver so that is how I will address the question. Hands down the buffers are the biggest time saver. I am on a budget as I mentioned so I am using bench grinders. $20 compared to $300 or more for a buffing motor, not today or anytime in the near future. There's just too many other expenses outstanding. The grinders will have to do. Most every razor I work on has the blade buffed up a little, even if just to bring out the shine. Next up is the Band Saw from a safety and time perspective. Scroll saws will work here also but a coping saw to cut out scales is too much work. I still don't have a belt sander, which is what I would prefer but I am making due w/o at minimal additional time. Table saw? Yea, it would work great but on a budget the band saw works OK. The result is extra work but will have to due for now. Drill press? I have one and use it but I could and have done the work by hand. Drill press is a pleasure though.

    In the end it how you use the tools you have and with what skill. A good mind and skilled hands will go a long way in the quality of your finished razor or what ever else you may be working on. The tools are just an extension of your hands and your hands an extension of your mind!!
    “If you always do what you always did, you will always get what you always got.” (A. Einstein)

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    Senior Member blabbermouth ChrisL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joed View Post
    This is a tough one Glen. So many ways to skin a cat. I've been restoring on a budget so in starting out most all work was done by hand. I would say that my hands are the most used tools and w/o skill and coordination with your hands this craft should not be attempted with power tools. It's just not safe. On the same level is a good head on your shoulders. Use the tools you have on hand to achieve your desired results in a safe manor.

    Everything else from here is a time saver so that is how I will address the question. Hands down the buffers are the biggest time saver. I am on a budget as I mentioned so I am using bench grinders. $20 compared to $300 or more for a buffing motor, not today or anytime in the near future. There's just too many other expenses outstanding. The grinders will have to do. Most every razor I work on has the blade buffed up a little, even if just to bring out the shine. Next up is the Band Saw from a safety and time perspective. Scroll saws will work here also but a coping saw to cut out scales is too much work. I still don't have a belt sander, which is what I would prefer but I am making due w/o at minimal additional time. Table saw? Yea, it would work great but on a budget the band saw works OK. The result is extra work but will have to due for now. Drill press? I have one and use it but I could and have done the work by hand. Drill press is a pleasure though.

    In the end it how you use the tools you have and with what skill. A good mind and skilled hands will go a long way in the quality of your finished razor or what ever else you may be working on. The tools are just an extension of your hands and your hands an extension of your mind!!
    Joed:

    I built one of these a year ago; Randydance has built several.
    NO WELD GRINDER

    The main expenses with this system are the motor and the contact wheels. The steel and fasteners are minimal in cost. If a person can find a 1725 motor for cheap or free, there are cheap and workable options for contact wheels; Randy is experimenting with making his own contact wheels using inexpensive materials. I bring this up because this grinder has POTENTIAL for costing very little to build.

    I like mine very much. I have not built all the attachments I want to build for it so I'm not using it as much as I'd like to. It was a fun project to build it.

    Chris L
    Last edited by ChrisL; 10-27-2009 at 04:34 PM.
    "Blues fallin' down like hail." Robert Johnson
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    Senior Member Richard's Avatar
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    Thanks Glen, but at the risk of sounding stupid, what do you use the vise for? I have tried a dremel vice for holding my dremel tool but found holding the blade to the work bench and fetching the dremel to it also gives good results. Am I missing somethine?

    Rich

    “Work and play are words used to describe the same thing under differing conditions.” – Mark Twain

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