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Thread: Flush Cutter - Pin removal method !!!

  1. #1
    all your razor are belong to us red96ta's Avatar
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    Default Flush Cutter - Pin removal method !!!

    Here are those pics I promised on how I use wire cutters to remove pins without damaging the scales.

    For those who have not seen the off-topic thread, I had mentioned that I don't use a drill or a file to remove my scale pins...I use a set of wire cutters.

    Here's my modest kit for the project...our victim today is a set of W&B Celebrated in really poor condition.



    Here's a closeup of the pin we'll be removing. With the scales in poor condition it might be difficult to get them off without damaging the decoration or breaking them.



    Ok...the secret, if there is one, is to snug the edges of the cutters in between the washer of the pin and the scale. The keeps you from having to file anything down from a bad cut.



    woot! Looks like a clean cut. The washer is gone leaving only the pin to drive out...



    The pin has been drifted out and the scales are undamaged.



    At any rate, gssixgun, hope this gives you a better idea of how I use the wire cutters to remove my pins. I figure you've already tried it for yourself based on our last conversation.

    Anybody else reading can enjoy my feeble attempt at a tutorial.
    Last edited by gssixgun; 12-01-2009 at 04:33 AM.

  2. The Following 46 Users Say Thank You to red96ta For This Useful Post:

    0livia (11-30-2009), 1971Wedge (12-06-2009), anesthesia (04-09-2012), baakabak (11-09-2010), baldy (11-30-2009), ben.mid (11-30-2009), Bordee (11-08-2014), ChrisMeyer (12-02-2009), Del1r1um (11-30-2009), DOOM (01-08-2010), Eric43 (12-06-2009), FTG (11-30-2009), Geezer (11-08-2010), gssixgun (11-30-2009), heck (12-03-2009), Heljen (11-29-2012), JimmyHAD (11-30-2009), JimR (11-30-2009), joke1176 (12-01-2009), jpm7676 (11-08-2010), Lejob (03-04-2015), lemke (02-25-2010), li885 (12-12-2009), lz6 (11-08-2010), Maximilian (11-30-2009), metalfab (11-08-2010), mjhammer (05-15-2011), Mvcrash (11-08-2010), nipper (02-20-2012), onimaru55 (11-30-2009), PaulyGoodshave (01-15-2011), Pete_S (11-30-2009), sachin (11-30-2009), sapito318 (11-30-2009), sleekandsmooth (02-20-2012), Sly712 (11-30-2009), tekbow (07-15-2011), tictac (05-10-2012), tinkersd (02-26-2012), ultrasoundguy2003 (04-20-2015), UtahRootBeer (11-30-2009), Walterbowens (11-11-2014), Wulfgar (11-30-2009), wvloony (12-11-2009), xenophon (06-22-2013), yoshida (11-30-2009)

  3. #2
    Large Member ben.mid's Avatar
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    Default

    Nothing feeble about it. It say's all it needs to! If it has a reasonable success rate it looks like a good method.

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    Admin & Forum fixer Bruno's Avatar
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    Cool. I am going to give this a try.
    My only concern would be to do this on fragile scales, like ivory, or certain types of wood.
    Happiness is a field, littered with the mangled corpses of your enemies. - Vlad III of Wallachia

  5. #4
    Senior Member blabbermouth JimR's Avatar
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    That's how I do it, but i use a punch instead of a nail...

    I thought it was kind of common. I started using the flush cut wire snips after I screwed up a couple of scales with filing...

  6. #5
    Senior Member rrp1501's Avatar
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    Not feeble at all! Very informative. I use that method myself. Don't sell yourself short. I think I can say for everybody here that we enjoy seeing any information from our friends and Brothers here. We can all learn something from even the newest of newbies!

  7. #6
    Beard growth challenged
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    Got to try that.
    I use to remove them with a carborundum wheel on the dremel/proxxon and thats very dirty.
    Your method is way cleaner.
    Thank you!

  8. #7
    JMS
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    Quote Originally Posted by 0livia View Post
    Got to try that.
    I use to remove them with a carborundum wheel on the dremel/proxxon and thats very dirty.
    Your method is way cleaner.
    Thank you!
    If you use the wire cutter method make sure you use flush cutters as normal wire cutters are beveled and can not cut flush against the scales

  9. #8
    Beard growth challenged
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    Thanks Mark, just browsing the bay for one...
    most seem to be bevelled though. Like the one I already have.
    Is there a special or typical purpose for the flush ones?
    Might make search easier.

  10. #9
    JMS
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    These are what I used when working for a sub contractor to Ma Bell:TESSCO Image Zoom, click window to close.

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    0livia (11-30-2009)

  12. #10
    Straight Shaver Apprentice DPflaumer's Avatar
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    Where is that little anvil from? It seems like just what I need...

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